Unstoppable at Short

 

Glancing Back, and Remembering Jim Fregosi

Jim Fregosi was the first everyday star for the Los Angeles Angels’ franchise, and he maintained that status for most of the 1960s. Good hitter, good fielder and good looking, he collected hits and fans consistently over an 18-year major league career.

As the Los Angeles Angels’ shortstop, Jim Fregosi was a perennial All-Star during the late 1960s. From 1964-1966, he averaged 15 home runs and 68 RBIs per season.

As the Los Angeles Angels’ shortstop, Jim Fregosi was a perennial All-Star during the late 1960s. From 1964-1966, he averaged 15 home runs and 68 RBIs per season.

In combination with second baseman Bobby Knoop, Fregosi was part of the American League’s most prolific double play combination.

The Boston Red Sox signed Fregosi in 1960. He spent one season in the Red Sox farm system before being selected by the Angels as the 35th pick in the 1960 expansion draft. He made his debut in an Angels uniform in 1961 and was the teams’ starting shortstop by 1963, when he hit .287 with 29 doubles and 50 RBIs. In 1964 he made his first All-Star appearance, finishing that season hitting .277 with 18 home runs and 72 RBIs.

In 11 seasons with the Angels, Fregosi was an All-Star six times and won a Gold Glove in 1967. He hit for a combined .268 batting average for the Angels. In 1968, he led the American League in triples with 13. His best season was 1970, when he hit .278 and had career bests in doubles (33), home runs (22) and RBIs (82).

In December of 1971, Fregosi was traded to the New York Mets in a deal that brought pitcher Nolan Ryan to the Angels. Injuries limited his effectiveness in New York.  As the Mets’ third baseman for two seasons, Fregosi averaged only 73 games a season, hitting a combined .233.

In 1971, the New York Mets gave up a young Nolan Ryan to acquire the 30-year-old Jim Fregosi. Injuries limited Fregosi’s effectiveness at the plate, and he lasted only a season and a half in New York, batting a combined .233.

In 1971, the New York Mets gave up a young Nolan Ryan to acquire the 30-year-old Jim Fregosi. Injuries limited Fregosi’s effectiveness at the plate, and he lasted only a season and a half in New York, batting a combined .233.

In July of 1973, the Texas Rangers purchased Fregosi, who spent the next five years as a reserve infielder for the Rangers. He spent parts of two seasons with the Pittsburgh Pirates before retiring in 1978.

At the time of his retirement, Fregosi held the Angels’ franchise record in a number of career offensive categories: games (1,429), hits (1,408), doubles (219), triples (70), runs (691), runs batted in (546) and home runs (115). He would later serve as manager of the Angels, as well as managing the White Sox and Phillies.

Dog Gone Productive

 

Glancing Back, and Remembering Tony Perez

In the prime of his career, first baseman Tony Perez was an RBI monster for the Cincinnati Reds. He was so productive for so long and so consistently that he quite naturally found a place in the Baseball Hall of Fame following a 23-year major league career.

Tony Perez was the Most Valuable Player in the 1967 All-Star game. That season, he batted .290 with 26 home runs and 102 RBIs.

Tony Perez was the Most Valuable Player in the 1967 All-Star game. That season, he batted .290 with 26 home runs and 102 RBIs.

That career began in the 1960s with the Reds, the team that signed him in 1960. He was named the Most Valuable Player in the Pacific Coast League in 1964, hitting 34 home runs with 107 RBIs for the Reds’ AAA affiliate, the (then minor league) San Diego Padres.

In 1965, his first full season with the Reds, Perez hit .260 with 12 home runs and 47 RBIs. He batted .265 in 1966, and then had his breakout season in 1967, batting .290 with 28 doubles, 26 home runs and 102 RBIs. He appeared in his first All-Star game that season, hitting the game-winning home run off Catfish Hunter in the fifteenth inning and being named the game’s Most Valuable Player.  At the end of the season, Perez finished eighth in the balloting for National League MVP.

Perez’s offensive number fell off slightly in 1968 (as was true for nearly all of baseball’s sluggers), but he put together another tremendous year in 1969, batting .294 with 31 doubles, 37 home runs and 122 runs batted in (third best in the National League behind Willie McCovey and Ron Santo). He improved on those numbers again in 1970, batting .317 with 40 home runs and 129 RBIs.

From 1967 through 1976, Perez averaged 26 home runs and 103 RBIs per season while batting a combined .286 over that decade. Following the 1976 season, Perez was traded with Will McEnaney to the Montreal Expos for Woodie Fryman and Dale Murray. In three seasons with the Expos, Perez averaged 15 home runs and 81 RBIs while batting .281. He spent three seasons with the Boston Red Sox, hitting 25 home runs with 105 RBIs in 1980. After a season in Philadelphia, Perez returned to the Reds in 1984 and spent three more seasons as a part-time performer, retiring after the 1986 season.

With 1,192 RBIs in a Cincinnati Reds uniform, Tony Perez is second all time to <a rel=

Perez retired with a .279 career batting average and 379 home runs. His 1,652 runs batted in put him twenty-eighth on the all-time list. His 1,192 RBIs with the Reds put him second to Johnny Bench in that category.

A five-time All-Star, Perez was inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2000.

 

Top_10_Reds_Cover

 

 

Free Report

Click Here for Instant Download

The Dodgers’ Hit Machine

 

Glancing Back, and Remembering Tommy Davis

In many ways, Tommy Davis is remembered – if at all – as one of the most over-rated hitters of the 1960s. It’s not only unfortunate, but grossly unfair. Few players in baseball history can match the offensive numbers that Davis put up, on either an individual season or career basis.

Tommy  Davis was the National League batting champion in both 1962 and 1963. In 1962, he led the major leagues in batting average (.346), hits (230) and runs batted in (153). He finished third in the MVP sweepstakes behind teammate <a rel=

In fact, most of the players who can at least match Tommy’s hitting statistics have a place of honor in the Baseball Hall of Fame.

While Davis may not have the numbers to qualify for Cooperstown, his outstanding career was, in fact, tempered only by the extraordinary expectations he created with his own outstanding performance at the beginning of his career.

Davis was signed by the Brooklyn Dodgers in 1956 and made his debut with the club as a pinch hitter in 1960. By 1961 Davis was a reserve player for the Los Angeles Dodgers, hitting .276 his rookie year. He became the Dodgers’ everyday left fielder in 1961, batting .278 with 15 home runs and 58 RBIs.

Nothing prior to 1962 suggested the kind of hitting monster Davis was to become that season. He won the National League batting title with a .346 average and led the major leagues in hits (236) and RBIs (153). He also achieved what would be career highs in runs (120), doubles (27), home runs (27) and slugging percentage (.535).

A single-season fluke? Davis proved otherwise in 1963 when he claimed his second consecutive batting championship, hitting .326 with 16 home runs and 88 RBIs. Yet it seemed like a “down” season compared to his output in 1962. And in 1964 his offensive numbers slipped further, to 16 home runs, 86 RBIs and a .275 batting average.

His productivity came to a crushing halt in 1965 when an aggressive slide into second base resulted in a fractured ankle. While never known for basepath speed, the injury nevertheless hurt his career. Davis was never the same player after it.

He rebounded in 1966 to hit .313, but it would be his last season in Dodger blue. The Dodgers traded Davis and Darrell Griffith to the New York Mets for Ron Hunt and Jim Hickman. Davis extended his comeback by hitting .302 for a full season in New York, with 16 home runs and 73 RBIs. But he was traded again after the 1967 season, this time to the Chicago White Sox in a six-player deal that brought Tommie Agee and Al Weis to the Mets. Davis led the White Sox in hitting (.268), and was promptly drafted by the expansion Seattle Pilots, his fourth team in four years.

Tommy Davis lasted 18 years in the major leagues, playing for 10 different teams and compiling a .294 career batting average. He hit .300 or better six times.

Tommy Davis lasted 18 years in the major leagues, playing for 10 different teams and compiling a .294 career batting average. He hit .300 or better six times.

Davis hit .271 for the Pilots in 123 games before being traded to the Houston Astros. Less than a year later, Davis was purchased by the Oakland Athletics, and then sold to the Chicago Cubs two months after that.  In all, he played for 10 different teams from 1966 to 1976, his last year in the majors. His longest stop was with the Baltimore Orioles from 1972 through 1975.

Despite his travels, Davis never really stopped hitting until the end of his playing career. He batted .324 for the A’s in 1971 and .306 for the Orioles in 1973, when he drove in 89 runs for the O’s. Altogether, Davis played 18 seasons in the big leagues and tallied 2,121 hits for a .294 career average.

Heady numbers for an “under” achiever.

Top_10_Dodgers_Cover

 

 

 

Free Report

Click Here for Instant Download

 

Twins Destroyer

 

This Week in 1960s Baseball

(May 24, 1967) Known more in the 1960s for their pitching rather than their hitting, the Chicago White Sox brought their run-scoring bats to Metropolitan Stadium today and clobbered the Minnesota Twins 14-1.

<a rel=

Tommy McCraw had three home runs and eight RBIs against the Twins on May 24, 1967.

Twins destroyer-in-chief was White Sox first baseman Tommy McCraw. McCraw, who entered the game with a .259 batting average, got three hits in six at-bats … all home runs. McCraw drove in eight runs for the game.

Altogether, the White Sox collected 21 hits off three Twins pitchers. Center fielder Ken Berry had four hits, and a pair of White Sox players — in addition to McCraw — had three hits each: catcher J.C. Martin, and pitcher Gary Peters. Peters also had two RBIs, and hit his first home run of the season, a solo blast off Jim Kaat in the ninth inning. Peters pitched a six-hit complete game, striking out nine and raising his season record to 6-1.

The losing pitcher was Twins ace Dean Chance, whose record dropped to 7-2. Chance allowed 10 hits and six earned runs in 6.1 innings.

The 14 runs would mark the highest scoring total for the White Sox during the 1967 season. In fact, the team reverted to more familiar form after this offensive outburst, scoring a total of 15 runs in its next seven games. The White Sox, in first place after this win over the Twins, would finish the season in fourth place in the American League with an 89-73 record, three games behind the pennant-winning Boston Red Sox.

The main beneficiary of the Chicago onslaught was starting pitcher <a rel=

Gary Peters pitched a six-hit complete game, striking out nine and driving in two runs himself.

The Twins would recover to battle with the Red Sox until the last day of the season. Chance would finish the 1967 season at 20-14 with a 2.73 ERA. He would also lead the league in starts, complete games and innings pitched.

McCraw would finish the 1967 season batting .236 with 11 home runs and 45 runs batted in.

Fast in Philly

 

Glancing Back, and Remembering Tony Gonzalez

With Willie Mays collecting one Gold Glove after another in center field, it was nearly impossible for any other National League center fielder to earn significant recognition, much less a Gold Glove, during the 1960s. That’s one of the reasons why Tony Gonzalez was one of the league’s under-rated outfielders when he patrolled center field for the Philadelphia Phillies from 1961 through 1968.

Tony Gonzalez’ best season came in 1963 when he batted .306 with 36 doubles, 12 triples (second in the National League) and 66 runs batted in.

And while Gonzalez couldn’t match the offensive capabilities of his center field counterpart in San Francisco, he brought to the Phillies’ lineup enough pop in his bat to make his defense all that much more valuable.

A Cuban native, Gonzalez was signed by the Cincinnati Reds in 1957. During his rookie season in 1960, he was traded with Lee Walls to the Philadelphia Phillies for Fred Hopke, Harry Anderson and Wally Post. He hit .299 in 78 games for the Phillies in his initial season.

From 1961 through 1968, Gonzalez hit for a combined average of .295, including a career-best .339 in 1967. That average was second best in the major leagues, trailing only Roberto Clemente’s .357. Gonzalez hit .302 in 1962 with 20 home runs and 63 RBIs. He drove in 66 runs in 1963, his career high.

Tony Gonzalez batted .274 as a rookie in 1960, a season divided between the Cincinnati Reds and the Philadelphia Phillies. He would be the Phillies’ starting center fielder for the next eight years.

Tony Gonzalez batted .274 as a rookie in 1960, a season divided between the Cincinnati Reds and the Philadelphia Phillies. He would be the Phillies’ starting center fielder for the next eight years.

But Gonzalez’s real prowess showed up in the field, where his outstanding range and excellent throwing accuracy made his hitting a plus.

Right after the 1968 season, the San Diego Padres made Gonzalez their thirty-seventh selection in the expansion draft. He started the season with San Diego, and then was traded to the Atlanta Braves in June, hitting .294 in 89 games with the Braves (with 10 home runs and 50 RBIs). He batted .265 as the Braves’ starting center fielder in 1970 until he was purchased by the California Angels. He hit .245 for the Angels in 1971, his final season in the majors.

He retired after 12 major league seasons with 1,485 hits and a .286 career batting average. Surprisingly, he was never selected for the National League All-Star team.

The Year Yaz and Boston Would Not Be Denied

 

Career Year: Carl Yastrzemski – 1967

In his first six seasons (1961-1966), Boston Red Sox outfielder Carl Yastrzemski was well on his way to building the kind of credentials that can land a player on a plaque in Cooperstown. He already had won a batting title (1963), had led the American League in doubles three times, and had won his first two Gold Gloves (with five more to come).

Replacing the great <a rel=

Ted Williams in left field, Carl Yastrzemski had put together a solid six seasons unfazed by the Splendid Splinter’s shadow. But his best was yet to come.

He had weathered intense  and uncompromising media and fan pressure by replacing Ted Williams in left field, and had even had an occasion when Carroll Hardy pinch hit for him (just as Hardy had once pinch hit for Williams – the only player ever to do so).

But Williams had brought an American League pennant to Boston two decades earlier, something Yastrzemski had not yet accomplished. With a Red Sox team that had been able to finish no higher than sixth in his career, it would take a super-human effort on Yastrzemski’s part to bring a World Series to Boston in 1967.

And that’s what he delivered.

He turned the 1967 season into his personal showcase, just as Frank Robinson had done the season before in winning the Triple Crown. Yastrzemski played like a man possessed, unfazed by the weight of the team on his back.

In the last 12 games of the 1967 season, Carl Yastrzemski hit five home runs, scored 14 runs and drove in 16. He had seven hits and six RBIs in the final two pennant-clinching games against the Minnesota Twins.

In the last 12 games of the 1967 season, Carl Yastrzemski hit five home runs, scored 14 runs and drove in 16. He had seven hits and six RBIs in the final two pennant-clinching games against the Minnesota Twins.

At the All-Star break, Yastrzemski was batting .324 with 19 home runs and 56 runs batted in. By the end of August, he was batting .308 with 35 home runs and 95 RBIs (already a new career high). And incredibly, the Red Sox – who had finished ninth in 1966 – were still in contention. In fact, Boston was locked in a four-team pennant race that wouldn’t be decided until the final day of the season.

Yastrzemski had a magnificent September, batting .417 with nine home runs and 26 RBIs in 27 games, almost single-handedly propelling the Red Sox to the pennant. In the last 12 games of the season, he hit five home runs, scored 14 runs and drove in 16. In the last two “must win” games against the Minnesota Twins, Yastrzemski went seven for eight with six RBIs.

During the 1967 World Series, which the St. Louis Cardinals won in seven games, Yastrzemski continued his offensive onslaught, batting .400 with three home runs.

In the last 12 games of the 1967 season, Carl Yastrzemski hit five home runs, scored 14 runs and drove in 16. He had seven hits and six RBIs in the final two pennant-clinching games against the Minnesota Twins.

Carl Yastrzemski’s performance in 1967 earned him a Triple Crown and the Most Valuable Player award.

When the regular season had ended, Yastrzemski was at the top of the league in nearly every offensive category: hits (189), runs (112), home runs (44, tied with Minnesota’s Harmon Killebrew), RBIs (121), total bases (360), slugging percentage (.622) and batting average (.326). His Triple Crown leadership in home runs, RBIs and batting average earned Yaz the league’s Most Valuable Player award.

Old, Reliable Youngster

 

Glancing Back, and Remembering Mel Stottlemyre

Had he been born a decade earlier and pitched in his prime with the New York Yankee powerhouses of the 1950s and early 1960s, Mel Stottlemyre almost certainly would have accumulated Hall-of-Fame-worthy numbers by the end of his career.

As a 22-year-old rookie in 1964, Mel Stottlemyre was called up in August and went 9-3 the rest of the season, solidifying the Yankees’ starting rotation and bringing New York its fifth consecutive American League pennant.

As a 22-year-old rookie in 1964, Mel Stottlemyre was called up in August and went 9-3 the rest of the season, solidifying the Yankees’ starting rotation and bringing New York its fifth consecutive American League pennant.

But it wasn’t to be. As the Yankees’ best starting pitcher in their late 1960s decline, Stottlemyre proved that his heart matched his talent. Unfortunately, the Yankees’ support – and his numbers for that period – didn’t match the effort and skills Stottlemyre consistently brought to the mound.

A member of the Yankees’ organization for his entire career, Stottlemyre was signed as a free agent in 1961. In 1964, he won 13 games for the Yankees’ AAA Richmond club before being called up to the big leagues and making his debut on August 12, 1964.

Over the course of the next six weeks, Stottlemyre went 9-3 with a 2.06 ERA as the Yankees won 22 out of 28 games in September to overcome the Chicago White Sox and clinch the American League pennant on the next-to-last day of the season. Stottlemyre was 1-1 in the 1964 World Series, and he was chosen to start the decisive seventh game on only two days’ rest. The Yankees lost that game 7-5, and Stottlemyre wasn’t involved in the decision.

Mel Stottlemyre led the league in complete games twice and averaged 272 innings per season from 1965-1973. The wear on his arm resulted in a torn rotator cuff that ended his career in 1974 at age 32.

Mel Stottlemyre led the league in complete games twice and averaged 272 innings per season from 1965-1973. The wear on his arm resulted in a torn rotator cuff that ended his career in 1974 at age 32.

Stottlemyre wasn’t an overpowering pitcher. He had excellent control and placement of his pitches, and threw “heavy” stuff that induced ground balls more than strikeouts. He was 20-9 in 1965 with a 2.93 ERA and led the American League in innings pitched with 291. In 1966, with a Yankees team that finished last in the American League, his record slipped to 12-20 though his ERA was still a respectable 3.80. It was the last time in the 1960s that Stottlemyre’s ERA would exceed 3.00.

A five-time All-Star, Stottlemyre pitched 250 or more innings in nine consecutive seasons. He was a 20-game winner again in 1968 and 1969, leading the league in complete games with 24 in 1969. He was the only Yankee pitcher since 1920 to win 20 or more games three times for non-pennant winning clubs.

In 11 seasons with the Yankees, Stottlemyre won 164 games and posted a career ERA of 2.97. A torn rotator cuff abruptly ended his career in 1974.

 

Top_10_Pitchers_Cover

 

 

 

Free Report

Click Here for Instant Download

Eight for Eight … Just Great

 

This Week in 1960s Baseball

(May 20, 1962) Always known more for his prowess with his glove than his bat, Chicago Cubs rookie second baseman Ken Hubbs today was baseball’s single best hitter.

Ken Hubbs won both a Gold Glove and the National League Rookie of the Year award for 1962.

In a double header against the Philadelphia Phillies, Chicago Cubs second baseman Ken Hubbs stroked eight singles on the day, raising his season’s batting average to .307.

During the Cubs’ double header sweep of the Philadelphia Phillies, Hubbs stroked eight singles in 10 trips to the plate at Connie Mack Stadium. Hubbs scored twice and drove in two runs as the Cubs won both ends of the twin bill, 6-4 and 11-2.

In the first game, the Phillies lost despite getting home runs from the bats of Tony Taylor, Johnny Callison and Clay Dalrymple. Cubs left fielder Lou Brock drove in four runs for winning pitcher Cal Koonce (2-0).

In the nightcap, home runs by Billy Williams, Ernie Banks and George Altman – in addition to Hubbs’ five for five hitting performance – spurred the Cubs to an 11-2 victory. Bob Buhl (2-2) pitched a complete game for the win.

At the end of this doubleheader, Hubbs was batting .307. He would finish the season – his first full season in the big leagues – batting .260 and winning the Gold Glove for his play at second base.

Ken Hubbs won both a Gold Glove and the National League Rookie of the Year award for 1962.

Ken Hubbs won both a Gold Glove and the National League Rookie of the Year award for 1962.

He would also be named Rookie of the Year for 1962.

Monster of the Midway

 

Oh, What a Relief: Dick Radatz

In an era when 20-save relievers were as rare as 20-game winners have become today, Dick Radatz was the first major league pitcher to post consecutive 20-save seasons. In fact, he had three consecutive seasons with 20+ saves, from 1962 to 1964, and was easily the most dominant relief pitcher in baseball over that period.

In 1963, Dick Radatz won 15 games and saved 25 more for a Boston team that won only 76 games on the season. It is frightening to think where the Red Sox would have finished without him.

In 1963, Dick Radatz won 15 games and saved 25 more for a Boston team that won only 76 games on the season. It is frightening to think where the Red Sox would have finished without him.

Radatz was a star in basketball and baseball at Michigan State University when he was signed by the Boston Red Sox in 1959. Used mostly as a starter, he won 12 games pitching for two minor league teams in 1960, and was moved to the bullpen in 1961. That was his path of entry to the big leagues a year later.

At six-foot-six and 230 pounds, his presence on the mound was imposing. His fast ball was intimidating. Radatz didn’t have an effective off-speed pitch. He didn’t need one. He came in throwing blistering heat, and for three seasons, most of the batters he faced went down swinging. In 1964, he struck out 181 batters in 157 innings, an average of 10.4 strikeouts per nine innings pitched. The season before, he averaged 11 strikeouts per nine innings.

He was, indeed, a “Monster,” so dubbed by Mickey Mantle, who struck out 47 times out of 63 career at-bats against Radatz. The nickname stuck.

In his 1962 rookie season, he was 9-6 with a 2.24 ERA in 62 appearances, all in relief. (Radatz never started in the major leagues.) He finished 53 games for the Red Sox, and saved the most games (24) in the American League. He turned around in 1963 and did even better: 15-6 with a 1.97 ERA and 25 saves for a Red Sox team that finished seventh with only 76 victories. He struck out 162 batters in 132.1 innings in 1963.

In 1964, Radatz appeared in 79 games. He finished 67 games and saved 29, both tops in the majors. His record was 16-9 with a 2.29 earned run average.

The fastball launched by Dick Radatz in his prime was little more than a scary blur. From 1962-1964, the “Monster” averaged 10.6 strikeouts per every nine innings pitched.

Then something went out of his fastball. He had pitched 314 innings in the three previous seasons, throwing hard on nearly every pitch, and apparently the wear on his arm was beginning to show.

In 1965, Radatz was 9-11 with a 3.91 ERA and 22 saves, but he registered “only” 121 strikeouts in 124.1 innings – the first time in his major league career when he averaged less than a strikeout per inning. A disastrous start in 1966 prompted the Red Sox to deal Radatz to the Cleveland Indians for pitchers Don McMahon and Lee Stange. The change in scenery didn’t help his declining velocity. Radatz finished the 1966 season with a combined record of 0-5 and a 4.64 ERA. He would play only two more seasons, for four different teams, but never regained his magic.

Radatz finished his seven-year major league career with a record of 52-43 and a 3.13 ERA. He had 122 saves. Radatz was a member of the American League All-Star team in 1963 and 1964. He was named the Sporting News American League Fireman of the Year in 1962 and 1964.

 

Top_10_Pitchers_Cover

 

 

 

Free Report

Click Here for Instant Download

Ringin’ Out the Wins

 

Glancing Back, and Remembering Gary Bell

Gary Bell started out his career as a hard-throwing starter, relying on heat and guts while pitching for struggling Cleveland Indians teams. He gradually evolved into one of the American League’s most effective middle relievers with off-speed pitches that helped him get more out of less fastball.

Gary Bell was a versatile pitcher for the Cleveland Indians, effective as both a starter and a reliever. He led the team with 16 saves in 1965, then was oved into the starting rotation in 1966, winning 14 games with a 3.22 ERA.

Gary Bell was a versatile pitcher for the Cleveland Indians, effective as both a starter and a reliever. He led the team with 16 saves in 1965, then was moved into the starting rotation in 1966, winning 14 games with a 3.22 ERA.

Bell was signed by the Indians and was pitching in the majors three years later, going 12-10 with a 3.31 ERA as an Indians starter. In 1959, again as mostly a starter for the Tribe, Bell went 16-11 with a 4.04 ERA

His record slipped to 9-10 in 1960 and 12-16 in 1961. In 1962, he was moved back to the Indians bullpen, going 10-9 with 12 saves. During the next three seasons, working almost exclusively in relief, Bell went 22-16 with a combined 3.42 ERA. The 1965 campaign produced career highs in both appearances (60) and saves (17).

In 1966, Bell returned to the Indians’ starting rotation, posting a 14-15 record with a 3.22 ERA. He led the Indians pitching staff in games started (37), complete games (12), and finished fifth in the American League (and second on the team to league-leader Sam McDowell) with a career-best 194 strikeouts.

Bell opened the 1967 season as a starter and lost five of his first six decisions for Cleveland before being traded to the Boston Red Sox for Tony Horton and Don Demeter. He went 12-8 the rest of the way for the pennant-winning Bosox, and followed up with an 11-11 season for Boston in 1968.

Acquired by the Boston Red Sox early in the 1967 season, Gary Bell played a prominent role in the team’s successful pennant push. Bell was 12-8 for the Red Sox, and saved two critical games in September.

Acquired by the Boston Red Sox early in the 1967 season, Gary Bell played a prominent role in the team’s successful pennant push. Bell was 12-8 for the Red Sox, and saved two critical games in September.

The Seattle Pilots selected Bell in the expansion draft prior to the 1969 season, and he went 2-6 for Seattle before being traded to the Chicago White Sox for pitcher Bob Locker. He appeared in 23 games for the White Sox with no decisions before being released and retiring.

Bell ended his career with a 121-117 record with a 3.68 ERA over 12 seasons. He was a three-time All-Star: in 1960, 1966 and 1968.

 

Top_10_Pitchers_Cover

 

 

 

Free Report

Click Here for Instant Download