Harmon’s Fastball Insurance

 

Homer Happy: Bob Allison

For the better part of his career, it was Bob Alison’s misfortune to find himself batting after Harmon Killebrew, the most prolific home run hitter of the 1960s.

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From 1961-1964, Bob Allison averaged 31 home runs and 96 RBIs per season.

Allison’s power statistics were regularly overshadowed by the beastly home run numbers that Killebrew consistently posted. Killebrew’s bat too often cleared the bases of runners who could have been Allison’s RBIs.

But Allison’s abilities were not overlooked by the American League pitchers who faced him, and who fed fastballs to Killebrew to avoid putting on base another potential run for Allison to bring home. The fact was, during the early 1960s, there were just too many lethal bats in the Minnesota Twins’ lineup for pitchers to issue free passes or make a mistake.

The Twins were the highest-scoring American League team of the 1960s, and Bob Allison was one reason why.

The Washington Senators signed Allison out of the University of Kansas in 1955. In four minor league seasons, Allison hit a total of only 28 home runs. But his .307 batting average in 1958 with Chattanooga in the AA Southern Association earned him a look with the Senators, and a spot on the Washington roster for 1959.

In his rookie season, Allison surprised everyone with his power. For 1959, he batted .261 with 30 home runs and 85 runs batted in, third on the team in both categories (behind Killebrew and Jim Lemon). Allison led the league with nine triples and was selected as American League Rookie of the Year.

In 1960 – the team’s last season in Washington, D.C. — Allison slipped to 15 home runs and 69 RBIs, though his 30 doubles were eighth best in the American League. His hitting rebounded when the Senators moved to Minnesota in 1961 to play as the Twins. Allison hit 29 home runs and drove in 105 runs, a performance he nearly duplicated in 1962 when he again hit 29 home runs and drove in 102 runs. He also scored 102 runs in 1962, third most in the league.

Bob Allison had his best season in 1963, hitting 35 home runs with 91 runs batted in. He also led the league in scoring with 99 runs.

Bob Allison had his best season in 1963, hitting 35 home runs with 91 runs batted in. He also led the league in scoring with 99 runs.

All this was accomplished while hitting behind Killebrew, who led the league in home runs (46) and RBIs (126).

Allison led the America League with 99 runs scored in 1963, hitting .271 with 35 home runs and 91 RBIs. It would be his highest single-season home run total, but Allison came close the following year with 32 home runs (and 86 RBIs).

Yet Allison’s productivity in the batter’s box was beginning a steady decline. In the Twins’ pennant-winning season of 1965, Allison (now 30) managed only 23 home runs with 78 RBIs on a .233 batting average. In 1966 he missed more than half the season with a broken left hand that limited him to eight home runs and 19 RBIs. He played full seasons in 1967 and 1968, hitting 24 and 22 home runs. He was a part-time player over his last two seasons, retiring in 1970.

In 13 major league seasons, he batted .255 with 256 home runs and 796 RBIs. Allison finished in the top ten in home runs among American Leaguers eight times during his career, and teamed with Killebrew in 1962 to become the first pair of sluggers to hit grand slam home runs in the same inning.

Allison was a member of the American League All-Star team three times.

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How the Yankees Found Their Savior for 1964

 

Swap Shop: Pedro Ramos for PTBNL

On September 4, 1964, the New York Yankees looked like they might not repeat as American League champions after four consecutive pennants.

After going 7-10 for the Cleveland Indians in 1964, Pedro Ramos turned into a lights-out reliever for the Yankees in September, going 1-0 with eight saves and a 1.25 ERA in 13 relief appearances.

After going 7-10 for the Cleveland Indians in 1964, Pedro Ramos turned into a lights-out reliever for the Yankees in September, going 1-0 with eight saves and a 1.25 ERA in 13 relief appearances.

After beating the Kansas City Athletics that day, the Yankees found themselves in third place, three games behind the Baltimore Orioles and Chicago White Sox. The Yankees had been stuck in third place for nearly a month after leading the league at the end of July. They struggled through a 14-16 August, and were 2-2 thus far in September.

That was about to change in 24 hours.

On September 5, the Yankees announced that they had acquired pitcher Pedro Ramos from the Cleveland Indians for cash and players to be named later. Ramos had started and relieved for the Tribe, and brought with him a record of 7-10 with a 5.14 ERA.

Ramos was a proven innings-eater who had made a career of pitching for bad teams – and mostly losing. He led the American League in losses for four consecutive seasons from 1958 through 1961, when he lost 20 games for the Minnesota Twins. The Twins traded him to Cleveland in 1962, when he posted only the second winning season (9-8) of his nine-year career.

No one in the media saw Ramos as a season saver. But that’s what he turned out to be.

Over the final 24 games of the season, the Yankees would capture the American League pennant by winning 20 games. Ramos appeared in 13 of those games, finished 11 and saved eight games. He was 1-0 with a 1.25 ERA for the Yankees, and his addition, along with the emergence of Mel Stottlemyre following his call-up in August, propelled the Yankees to their fifth consecutive American league pennant.

The late-season acquisition of Pedro Ramos turned out to be a “buy now, pay later” bargain for the Yankees. After winning the 1964 pennant, the Yankees sent pitchers <a rel=

And best of all, the Yankees gave up nothing for Ramos until after the season. The players to be named later turned out to be two pitchers: right-hander Ralph Terry, who was 7-11 with a 4.54 ERA in 1964, and Bud Daley, a lefty who went 3-2 with a 4.63 ERA in 1964. Essentially, the Yankees traded two pitchers on the downside of their careers for a pennant. No brainer.

There was one downside for the Yankees. Since Ramos was acquired in September, he was not eligible for the World Series. They could have used him, dropping the 1964 World Series four games to three to the St. Louis Cardinals.

The Ramos acquisition continued to pay benefits to the Yankees in 1965. Working exclusively out of the bullpen, Ramos made 65 appearances in 1965 with a 5-5 record and a 2.92 ERA. He finished 42 games and saved 19, eighth most in the league.

Wet Wins

 

Glancing Back, and Remembering Gaylord Perry

Gaylord Perry was a great pitcher partly because he was also a great mound psychologist.

Gaylord Perry won 314 games over a 22-year major league career. He was the first pitcher to win the <a rel=

Notorious for being the last great spitball pitcher (a pitch outlawed four decades before Perry’s career began), he deftly used the uncertainty of that pitch to keep batters thinking about it rather than concentrating on his “stuff,” which was considerable … wet or dry.

Perry was signed by the San Francisco Giants in 1958 and made his debut with the team at the end of the 1962 season. He was used primarily as a long reliever and spot starter during his first three seasons with the Giants, but gradually moved into the Giants’ starting rotation and posted a 21-8 record with a 2.99 ERA in 1966.

Perry was always an “innings eater” and, from 1967 through 1975, never pitched less than 280 innings in a season. He pitched more than 300 innings six times in his career. He won 50 games for the Giants from 1967 through 1969, and led the National League in victories with a 23-13 record in 1970 (the same year that brother Jim Perry led the American League with 24 wins and won the American League Cy Young award).

Perry went 16-12 in 1971 with a 2.76 ERA, and over the winter the Giants dealt Perry and shortstop Frank Duffy to the Cleveland Indians for Sam McDowell. Perry responded with the best season of his career: a 24-16 record (one-third of the Indians’ 72 victories), a 1.92 ERA over 342.2 innings pitched, and 29 complete games, including five shutouts. He was named American League Cy Young award winner for the 1972 season.

Gaylord Perry’s breakout season came in 1966, when he went 21-8 with a 2.99 ERA for the San Francisco Giants. That season he was also named to the All-Star team for the first time.

Gaylord Perry’s breakout season came in 1966, when he went 21-8 with a 2.99 ERA for the San Francisco Giants. That season he was also named to the All-Star team for the first time.

Perry won 19 games for the Tribe in 1973 and 21 games in 1974. He pitched 57 complete games over those two seasons. During the 1975 season, he was traded to the Texas Rangers for Jim Bibby, Jackie Brown, Rick Waits and $100,000. He won a combined 18 games that season, and followed up with a pair of 15-win campaigns over the next two seasons. Then Perry was traded to the San Diego Padres, and posted a 21-6 record with a 2.73 ERA in 1978 – good enough to claim his second Cy Young award. Perry was the first pitcher to win that award in each league.

He hung on for five more years, pitching for Texas, the New York Yankees, Atlanta Braves, Seattle Mariners and Kansas City Royals. He closed out his 22-year career with a 314-265 record and a 3.11 ERA. He pitched 5,350 innings over his career, the sixth highest total in major league history.

A five-time All-Star, Perry was elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1991.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Kralick No-Hitter Starts with 25 Outs

 

This Week in 1960s Baseball

(August 26, 1962) At Metropolitan Stadium, Minnesota Twins‘ left-hander Jack Kralick threw the team’s first no-hitter since the franchise moved from Washington D.C. following the 1960 season.

Kralick’s no-no was the fifth pitched in the major leagues this season.

Left-hander Jack Kralick faced only 28 batters – retiring the first 25 – in pitching a 1-0 no-hitter against the Kansas City Athletics. It was the first no-hitter ever by a Minnesota Twins pitcher.

Left-hander Jack Kralick faced only 28 batters – retiring the first 25 – in pitching a 1-0 no-hitter against the Kansas City Athletics. It was the first no-hitter ever by a Minnesota Twins pitcher.

Kralick (10-8) faced only 28 batters in pitching the 1-0 shutout over the Kansas City Athletics.

The Twins southpaw retired the first 25 A’s batters he faced before a walk to George Alusik ended his bid for a perfect game. Stranding Alusik at first, Kralick retired the next two batters to complete the no-hitter, facing only one batter more than the minimum. Kralick struck out three and walked one in pitching the no-hit gem.

The Twins scored the game’s only run in the bottom of the seventh inning off the A’s starter Bill Fischer (4-6). Second baseman Bernie Allen opened the inning with a single to right field, and moved to second base when Zoilo Versalles was safe on a bunt and fielder’s choice. Kralick bunted the runners to second and third, and center fielder Lenny Green lofted a fly ball to deep center field, scoring Allen on the sacrifice fly.

In three seasons with the Twins. Jack Kralick was 26-26 with a 3.74 ERA and four shutouts. He won 51 games for the Twins and Cleveland Indians from 1961-1964.

In three seasons with the Twins. Jack Kralick was 26-26 with a 3.74 ERA and four shutouts. He won 51 games for the Twins and Cleveland Indians from 1961-1964.

Kralick would finish the 1962 season at 12-11 with a 3.86 ERA. His no-hitter against the Athletics would be his only shutout of the season, and one of seven complete games.

It would be Kralick’s last full season with the Twins. In May of 1963, he would be traded to the Cleveland Indians for pitcher Jim Perry.

 

 

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Dodger Destroyer Strikes Again

 

Lights Out: Larry Jaster Blanks Los Angeles for the Fifth Time … in One Season

When: September 28, 1966

Where:  Busch Stadium, St. Louis, Missouri

Game Time: 2:27

Attendance: 16,146

Pitcher Larry Jaster won 35 games during his seven-year major league career. Five of those victories came in a single season, against a single team: the team that would claim the National League pennant.

Larry Jaster was 11-5 with a 3.26 ERA for the Cardinals in 1966. Against the Los Angeles Dodgers that season, Jaster was 5-0 with a 0.00 ERA. He struck out 31 Dodgers in 45 innings pitched.

Larry Jaster was 11-5 with a 3.26 ERA for the Cardinals in 1966. Against the Los Angeles Dodgers that season, Jaster was 5-0 with a 0.00 ERA. He struck out 31 Dodgers in 45 innings pitched.

The left-handed Jaster was signed by the St. Louis Cardinals in 1962 and made his debut with the Cardinals in 1965, pitching a scoreless inning against the Los Angeles Dodgers in a game St. Louis lost 3-2.

Jaster made three starts after that initial appearance, going 3-0 with a 1.61 ERA. The Dodgers were the only team Jaster faced but didn’t beat in 1965. That would be rectified – repeatedly – in 1966.

Jaster was 1-1 when he first faced the Dodgers in 1966, beating them 2-0 on a seven-hit shutout, striking out seven batters and walking none. He faced the Dodgers again on July 3, and shut them out again on three hits.

On July 29, Jaster faced the Dodgers again and pitched another shutout, winning 4-0 on a five-hitter. When Jaster faced the Dodgers for the fifth time that season, they were still fighting off the Pittsburgh Pirates for the National League pennant. The Dodgers started 12-game winner Don Sutton against the Cardinals and Jaster, who was 10-5 coming into his final start on the season. Both teams were scoreless after three innings. Jaster retired the first 11 Los Angeles batters.

Larry Jaster’s mastery over the Dodgers lasted only one season. Take away his 1966 performance, and Jaster was only 4-5 with a 4.18 ERA in 20 career appearances (13 starts).

Larry Jaster’s mastery over the Dodgers lasted only one season. Take away his 1966 performance, and Jaster was only 4-5 with a 4.21 ERA in 20 career appearances (13 starts).

In the bottom of the fourth, Curt Flood reached base on an error and Tim McCarver walked. Two outs later, both runners scored on Ed Spiezo’s double. Jaster retired the Dodgers in order in the fifth and sixth innings. In the top of the seventh, Jaster gave up two singles, but struck out Al Ferrara to notch another scoreless inning. In the top of the eighth, Jaster gave up a walk but no runs. In the top of the ninth he retired the Dodgers in order.

Jaster’s four-hitter was his fifth shutout of the Dodgers that season: five starts, 45 innings, no runs. Over the rest of his career, which would last only five more seasons, Jaster would be 4-5 with a 4.21 ERA against the Dodgers.

The Dodgers survived Jaster to win the 1966 National League pennant by 1.5 games over the San Francisco Giants.

Lasting Relief

 

Oh, What a Relief: Lindy McDaniel

The 1960s were the baseball decade that witnessed the emergence of the relief specialist. And among the outstanding relief pitchers who toiled during the 1960s, few could claim a more brilliantly consistent career than that of Lindy McDaniel.

Lindy McDaniel led the National League in saves in 1959, 1960 and 1963.

Lindy McDaniel led the National League in saves in 1959, 1960 and 1963.

He pitched for 21 seasons, from 1955 to 1975. Among relievers, only Hoyt Wilhelm could match his record for longevity.

The St. Louis Cardinals signed McDaniel as a free agent in 1955. His minor league career lasted only six games (4-1 with a 3.64 ERA) as he joined the big league club at the end of 1955. He took turns as both a starter and reliever for the Cardinals in 1957, going 15-9 with a 3.49 ERA.

Gradually, McDaniel did less starting and more relieving for the Cards. In 1959 he went 14-12 and led the major leagues with 15 saves (in the days when starters were expected to pitch complete games). McDaniel had an outstanding season in 1960, with a 12-4 record and a 2.09 ERA. His 26 saves that season were again best in the majors, and earned McDaniel the first Fireman of the Year award as baseball’s best reliever. (He would win that award again in 1963.)

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Following the 1962 season, McDaniel was traded with pitcher Larry Jackson and catcher Jimmie Schaffer to the Chicago Cubs for outfielder George Altman, pitcher Don Cardwell and catcher Moe Thacker. For the Cubs in 1963, he won 13 games (all in relief) and saved 22 more (NL best). In his three seasons in Chicago, McDaniel averaged 64 relief appearances per season with a 3.06 ERA.

McDaniel spent two seasons with the San Francisco Giants, and then was traded to the New York Yankees in 1968 for pitcher Bill Monbouquette. In six seasons with the Yankees, McDaniel appeared in 265 games with a combined ERA of 2.89. His best season in New York was 1970, when his record was 9-5 in 62 appearances, with 29 saves and an ERA of 2.01. He closed out his career with the Kansas City Royals, retiring after the 1975 season.

In 21 major league seasons, McDaniel won 141 games and saved 174 with a 3.45 career earned run average. He was an All-Star in 1960.

 

 

 

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About Wins Gathering Mossi (And Vice Versa)

 

Glancing Back, and Remembering Don Mossi

For most of his career – at least until his arm finally gave out – Don Mossi was effective as a starting pitcher or reliever, depending on his team’s needs at the time.

As part of a dynamic starting rotation that included <a rel=

When the outstanding starting rotation of the Cleveland Indians of the 1950s kept the young Mossi in the Tribe’s bullpen, he excelled there. When he had the opportunity to become a regular starter, first in Cleveland and then with the Detroit Tigers, he had his finest seasons.

Mossi was signed by the Indians in 1949 and spent five seasons progressing through Cleveland’s farm system as a starter. His rookie year was 1954 with Cleveland’s American League championship team … a team with established starters such as Bob Feller, Bob Lemon, Mike Garcia and Early Wynn. Working mostly out of the bullpen, Mossi was 6-1 with a 1.94 ERA and seven saves. Over the next two seasons as an Indians’ reliever, Mossi was a combined 10-8 with 20 saves, appearing in 105 games with a 3.03 earned run average.

In 1957, Cleveland needed Mossi as a spot starter, and he started in 22 of his 36 appearances. He was 11-10 in 1957, and then returned to a reliever’s role in 1958, going 7-8 with a 3.90 ERA.

Control was Don Mossi’s greatest strength as a pitcher. From 1959-1962, Mossi finished among the top five each season in strikeout-to-walk ratio, leading the league in 1961 with 2.915 strikeouts to every bases on balls issued. His 1.76 walks per nine innings was the lowest in the league in 1961.

Control was Don Mossi’s greatest strength as a pitcher. From 1959-1962, Mossi finished among the top five each season in strikeout-to-walk ratio, leading the league in 1961 with 2.915 strikeouts to every bases on balls issued. His 1.76 walks per nine innings was the lowest in the league in 1961.

In November of 1958, the Indians traded Mossi with Ossie Alvarez and Ray Narleski to the Tigers for Al Cicotte and Billy Martin. As a starter for the Tigers, Mossi went 17-9 in 1959. His ERA was 3.36 with 15 complete games and three shutouts. Injuries limited his effectiveness in 1960 to 9-8 with a 3.47 ERA, and then Mossi had his best all-around season in 1961 as part of a dynamic starting rotation that included Frank Lary and Jim Bunning. Mossi went 15-7 with a 2.96 ERA and 12 complete games. He pitched 240.1 innings, which would be his career high. He also had the league’s lowest rates of bases on balls per nine innings (1.88) and the league’s best strikeout-to-walk ratio (2.91).

Time was starting to take its toll on Mossi’s left arm. He could pitch only 180.1 innings in 1962, his record slipping to 11-13 and his ERA growing to 4.19. Arm problems limited Mossi to 16 starts and a 7-7 record in 1963, and he was sold to the Chicago White Sox, where he was 3-1 with a 2.93 ERA in 1964. He finished his career with the Kansas City A’s, going 5-8 in 1965 with a 3.74 ERA.

Mossi had a 12-year career record of 101-80 with 50 saves and a 3.43 ERA. He was an All-Star in 1957.

 

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Did Hank Really Hit 756?

 

This Week in 1960s Baseball

(August 18, 1965)  The Milwaukee Braves won their sixth straight game with a 5-3 victory in St. Louis over the Cardinals.

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Hank Aaron’s 28th home run of the 1965 season turned out to be a mirage. Aaron’s blast off Curt Simmons was disallowed when he was called out for being out of the batter’s box.

The Braves scored the winning runs in the ninth inning off Cardinals reliever Ray Washburn (8-9). A two-out, two-run, pinch homer by Don Dillard was the difference for the league-leading Braves.

It was the third home run of the game for the Braves, although only two counted. Outfielder Mack Jones hit home run number 24 on the season off Cardinals starter Curt Simmons in the sixth inning. That blast put the Braves on top 3-2. The Cardinals tied the game in the bottom of the sixth on an RBI-single by Ken Boyer.

An eighth-inning home run by Hank Aaron was the one that didn’t count. With one out, Aaron took Simmons long, hitting the ball on top of the pavilion at Sportman’s Park. However, home plate umpire Chris Pelekoudas called Aaron out for being out of the batter’s box.

Hank Aaron’s 28th home run of the 1965 season turned out to be a mirage. Aaron’s blast off Curt Simmons was disallowed when he was called out for being out of the batter’s box.

Braves starter Tony Cloninger stopped the Cardinals on six hits and was backed by three Braves home runs … two of which actually counted.

The winning pitcher for the Braves was Tony Cloninger (18-8), who went the distance, giving up six hits and striking out nine Cardinals. Cloninger finished the 1965 season at 24-11, his best year in the majors.

It was the Braves’ last season in Milwaukee, and the victory put their record at 69-49, a half-game ahead of the Los Angeles Dodgers. They faded after that, going 17-27 over the rest of the season to finish in fifth place.

Aaron, finished his career as the major leagues’ all-time home run leader with 755. At least those were the ones that counted.

Go Get ‘Em.

 

The Glove Club: Jim Landis

During his 11-year major league career, Jim Landis was an outstanding center fielder who could also hit (enough) for average and occasional power.

Jim Landis collected five consecutive Gold Gloves from 1960-1964. His .993 fielding percentage in 1963 topped all American League outfielders.

Jim Landis collected five consecutive Gold Gloves from 1960-1964. His .993 fielding percentage in 1963 topped all American League outfielders.

He was signed by the Chicago White Sox in 1952 and spent the next five years working his way through the White Sox farm system (after two years of military service). He debuted with the White Sox in 1957 at the age of 23, batting .212 in 96 games.

He became the White Sox regular center fielder in 1958, batting .277 with 15 home runs and 64 RBIs. From 1958 through 1963, Landis batted a combined .258 while averaging 13 home runs and 61 RBIs per season. His most productive season offensively came in 1961, when he batted .283 with 22 home runs and 85 RBIs. He also won his second of five consecutive Gold Gloves that season.

After eight seasons in Chicago, Landis was sent to the Kansas City Athletics (with Mike Hershberger and Fred Talbot) in a three-team deal that brought Tommie Agee, Tommy John and John Romano to the White Sox and sent Rocky Colavito to the Cleveland Indians. He hit .239 for the A’s in 1965, and then was traded to the Indians for Phil Roof and Joe Rudi.

Jim Landis’ most productive season offensively came in 1961, when he batted .283 with 22 home runs and 85 RBIs.

Landis batted .222 for Cleveland in 1966, and spent 1967 playing for three teams. He was traded by the Indians with Doc Edwards and Jim Weaver to the Houston Astros for Lee Maye and Ken Retzer. Then in June he was traded by the Astros to the Detroit Tigers for Larry Sherry. The Tigers released Landis in August and he signed as a free agent with the Boston Red Sox. He spent a week in Boston, and then was released. He hit a combined .237 for the 1967 season.

Landis retired after 11 major league seasons with a career batting average of .247. He was a member of the American League All-Star team in 1962.

Mac-Attack

 

Homer Happy: Dick McAuliffe

Dick McAuliffe played hard and swung hard. For an infielder, he had plenty of pop in his bat, and was an integral part of the Detroit Tigers’ 1968 World Series championship team.

Known for his wide-open batting stance and high leg kick before swinging, Dick McAuliffe hit 142 home runs during the 1960s – 39th among all major league players.

Known for his wide-open batting stance and high leg kick before swinging, Dick McAuliffe hit 142 home runs during the 1960s – 39th among all major league players.

McAuliffe was signed by Detroit in 1957 and made the Tigers to stay in 1961. He became the team’s starting second baseman that year, hitting .256 with six home runs and 33 RBIs in half a season.

McAuliffe was a versatile infielder, and the Tigers took full advantage of that versatility. He split the 1962 season between third base and shortstop, hitting .263 with 12 home runs and 63 RBIs.

McAuliffe was the team’s regular shortstop from 1963 through 1967, hitting .254 over that period while averaging 19 home runs and 60 RBIs per season. His personal highs came in 1964, when he hit 24 home runs and drove in 66 runs. He was a member of the American League All-Star team for three consecutive seasons starting in 1965.

In 1967, McAuliffe moved over to second base and was the Tigers’ starter at that position for the next seven seasons. In 1968, he led the American League by scoring 95 runs. He had 50 extra-base hits that season, with a .344 on-base percentage and a .411 slugging percentage.

Dick McAuliffe led the American League with 95 runs scored in 1968. He batted .249 that season with 16 home runs and 56 RBIs … and finished seventh in the voting for MVP.

Dick McAuliffe led the American League with 95 runs scored in 1968. He batted .249 that season with 16 home runs and 56 RBIs … and finished seventh in the voting for MVP.

In the 1968 World Series, McAuliffe had six hits including a home run and three RBIs. From 1964 through 1969, his on-base percentage was .353 and his slugging percentage was .437, with career highs in both hitting categories (.373 and .509, respectively) coming in 1966.

Over the next five seasons, his power numbers slipped slightly from their peak in the mid-1960s, but they were still more than respectable for an infielder, averaging 14 home runs and 48 RBIs. He played two seasons with the Boston Red Sox before retiring in 1975 after 16 major league seasons.

McAuliffe posted a .247 career batting average with 1,530 hits and 197 home runs.

 

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