Zim Brings Relief

 

Swap Shop: Don Zimmer for Ron Perranoski

At the opening of the 1960s, Don Zimmer had already spent more than a decade as part of the Dodgers’ organization. An accomplished infielder with occasional pop in his bat, Zimmer was signed by the Dodgers in 1949 and made the Brooklyn squad in 1954.

Don Zimmer’s value as a utility infielder was worth three minor league players to the Chicago Cubs. But Zimmer spent only two seasons in Chicago before being drafted by the New York Mets. He was an All-Star selection in 1962, his second and last season with the Cubs.

Don Zimmer’s value as a utility infielder was worth three minor league players to the Chicago Cubs. But Zimmer spent only two seasons in Chicago before being drafted by the New York Mets. He was an All-Star selection in 1962, his second and last season with the Cubs.

His versatility as a fielder made him a valuable utility player for the Dodgers. From 1954-1957, he was the backup shortstop to Pee Wee Reese. In 1958, his only season as an everyday with the Dodgers, Zimmer took over as the team’s shortstop and delivered his best season at the plate: batting .262 with 17 home runs, 60 RBIs and 14 stolen bases for the Dodgers (now located in Los Angeles).

But in 1959, Zimmer split the shortstop duties with a young player named Maury Wills, and responded to platooning with a .165 batting average.

It would be his last season in Dodger blue.

While Zimmer’s versatility made him a valuable bench asset to Dodger manager Walt Alston, he was valued more by the Chicago Cubs. Just before the start of the 1960 season, the Cubs acquired Zimmer for $25,000 and three players: minor league outfielder Lee Handley, infielder Johnny Goryl, and a 24-year-old southpaw named Ron Perranoski.

At first, it looked as if the Cubs had gotten the best of the deal. Zimmer played all three positions on the left side of the Cubs’ 1960 infield (plus two appearances in left field), batting .258 with six home runs and 35 runs batted in. In 1961, as the Cubs’ regular second baseman, Zimmer was named to the All-Star team in a season where he batted .252 with 13 home runs, 40 RBIs and a career-best 25 doubles.

Ron Perranoski was the anchor in the Dodgers’ bullpen for that team’s pennant seasons of 1963, 1965 and 1966. Perranoski won 16 games for the Dodgers (all in relief) in 1963 while saving 21.

Ron Perranoski was the anchor in the Dodgers’ bullpen for that team’s pennant seasons of 1963, 1965 and 1966. Perranoski won 16 games for the Dodgers (all in relief) in 1963 while saving 21.

Meanwhile, the Dodgers saw little early return on the trade. None of the players acquired in exchange for Zimmer played for the Dodgers in 1960. Handley never made it to the major leagues. Goryl spent two seasons in the minors before being drafted by the Minnesota Twins (where he played for three seasons as a utility infielder).

And then there was Perranoski. He spent the 1960 season in AAA, going 12-11 with a 2.58 ERA. But after having served primarily as a starter in two seasons in the Cubs’ farm system, Perranoski was being groomed as a reliever by the Dodgers. He made the Dodgers’ roster in 1961, coming out of the bullpen for all but one of his 53 appearances, and posting a 7-5 record with a 3.04 ERA and six saves. In 1962, he appeared in 70 games, finishing 39 and saving 19 to go with a 6-6 record and a 3.35 earned run average.

Zimmer spent the 1962 season in New York and Cincinnati, selected by the Mets in the 1961 expansion draft and then traded to the Reds five weeks into the 1962 season. He batted a combined .213. He would play three more seasons in the major leagues, followed by a year in Japan and an ill-fated comeback attempt in the minors in 1967. He spent the next four decades in baseball as a coach and manager, both in the minors and at the major league level.

Perranoski emerged as one of the most effective relievers of the 1960s. He was 16-3 for the Dodgers in 1963 with a 1.67 ERA and 21 saves. Over the next four seasons, he won 23 games and saved 54 with a 2.73 combined ERA. Perranoski was traded to the Minnesota Twins in 1968 and led the American League in saves in 1969 and 1970.

Zimmer’s baseball career lasted longer than the combined major league careers of the three players the Cubs surrendered to get him. But the trade for Perranoski turned out to be the biggest contribution Zimmer ever made to the Dodger organization that signed him.

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Rocky Takes the Fast Lane Out of Cleveland

 

Swap Shop: Rocky Colavito for Harvey Kuenn

It was a deal that stunned fans in two cities, as well as the American League as a whole. The trade of the reigning batting champion for the reigning home run champion defined the careers of the players involved, as well as the man who engineered it.

And baseball in Cleveland has never been the same.

Leading the American League in home runs in 1959 wasn’t enough to keep Rocky Colavito in Cleveland. He was traded to the Detroit Tigers on the eve of Opening Day in 1960.

Leading the American League in home runs in 1959 wasn’t enough to keep Rocky Colavito in Cleveland. He was traded to the Detroit Tigers on the eve of Opening Day in 1960.

Rocky Colavito was already a legend in Cleveland at the start of the 1960s. He hit 21 home runs as a rookie in 1956, and banged out 41 homers in 1958 while leading the American League with a .620 slugging percentage. To prove that performance was no fluke, Colavito led the league with 42 home runs in 1959 and finished second with 111 RBIs.

Only one man could keep Colavito from being one of the Indians’ all-time slugging greats, and that man was Frank Lane. Lane had become the Indians’ general manager in November of 1957, after spending two years in that position with the St. Louis Cardinals. He was known as “Trader” Lane for his propensity to trade any player, including an attempt to send Stan Musial to the Philadelphia Phillies for pitcher Robin Roberts … a deal nixed by Cardinals’ owner August Busch.

Lane dealt Colavito to the Detroit Tigers for outfielder (and reigning American League batting champion) Harvey Kuenn two days before the opening of the 1960 season. The Indians were never the same. After finishing second to the Chicago White Sox in 1959, the team stumbled to a fourth-place finish in 1960, the first of five consecutive losing records for the Tribe in the 1960s. In those five seasons, Cleveland ended up no higher than its fourth-place finish in 1960, and twice finished as low as sixth place. The franchise languished in the middle of the American League pack, and didn’t see a winning season until 1965, when Colavito’s bat had been reclaimed.

(Lane was long gone by that point, as were all of the players he inherited in 1957. By the end of the 1960 season, none of the players on that team had been with the Indians when Lane arrived.)

In exchange for Colavito, the Indians got outfielder Harvey Kuenn, who had led the American League with a .353 batting average in 1959. Kuenn lasted one year in Cleveland, batting .308.

In exchange for Colavito, the Indians got outfielder Harvey Kuenn, who had led the American League with a .353 batting average in 1959. Kuenn lasted one year in Cleveland, batting .308.

Kuenn was no slouch with the lumber, and his league-leading .353 batting average in 1959 was no fluke. Over seven seasons with the Tigers, Kuenn batted .314 and averaged 192 hits per season. From 1953-1959, his batting average slipped below .300 only once (.277 in 1957), and he led the league in doubles three times over that period.

But Kuenn wasn’t the run producer that Colavito had been for the Tribe, or would be for the Tigers. Kuenn averaged only 59 RBIs for the Tigers, and scored at an average of 88 runs per season. In his only season with Cleveland, Kuenn batted .308 with nine home runs and 54 RBIs. Those weren’t the kinds of numbers that would inspire Cleveland fans to forget their beloved Colavito, or forgive Lane for letting Rocky get away. Following the 1960 season, Kuenn was traded to the San Francisco Giants for pitcher Johnny Antonelli and outfielder Willie Kirkland.

Rocky Colavito played for four years with the Tigers, averaging 35 home runs and 108 RBIs per season. Starting in 1960, the Indians didn’t post a winning record until 1965, when Colavito was back in their lineup (and leading the American League with 108 RBIs).

Colavito had several outstanding seasons for the Tigers. In 1960, he hit “only” 35 home runs and drove in 87 runs. His runs scored dropped from 90 in 1959 to 67 in 1960 … but that was still two runs more than Kuenn scored that same season. Colavito rebounded in 1961 to bat .290 with 45 home runs and 140 RBIs. He scored 129 runs in 1961, third most in the American League.

From 1958-1962, no one in major league baseball hit as many home runs as Rocky Colavito. And no one in the American League drove more runs home during that five-year stretch.

 

 

 

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How Lou Flew to St. Loo

 

Swap Shop: Lou Brock for Ernie Broglio

It was probably the most lopsided trade of the 1960s. (After all, Milt Pappas was 30-29 in two-plus seasons for the Cincinnati Reds.)

At first, it looked like a “steal” for the Chicago Cubs. It turned out that the St. Louis Cardinals added a base thief who would be pivotal in helping them steal the 1964 National League pennant.

Ernie Broglio was the key player the Chicago Cubs coveted in the Lou Brock deal. Coming off an 18-8 season with the Cardinals in 1963, Broglio would win only seven games for the Cubs before retiring in 1966.

Ernie Broglio was the key player the Chicago Cubs coveted in the Lou Brock deal. Coming off an 18-8 season with the Cardinals in 1963, Broglio would win only seven games for the Cubs before retiring in 1966.

The Cardinals sent two former 20-game winners, Ernie Broglio and Bobby Shantz, along with outfielder Doug Clemens, to the Cubs for pitchers Jack Spring and Paul Toth, and an outfielder named Lou Brock.

From the Cubs’ perspective, Broglio was the key player in the deal. He was a proven winner, notching 21 victories in 1960 and leading the Cardinals in 1963 with an 18-8 record and a 2.99 ERA. From 1960-1963, Broglio averaged 15 wins and 218 innings per season, with a combined ERA of 3.15.

But that wasn’t the Ernie Broglio that the Cubs received in exchange for Brock.

In 11 starts for the Cardinals in 1964, Broglio was 3-5 with a 3.50 ERA. A change of scenery didn’t help. Over the rest of the 1964 campaign, Broglio was 4-7 with a 4.04 ERA for the Cubs.

And the other players acquired by the Cubs didn’t help to compensate for Broglio’s slide. In 20 relief appearances with the Cubs, Shantz was 0-1 with a 5.56 ERA and a single save. And Clemens batted .279 with two home runs and 12 RBIs in 54 games.

(In August, the Cubs sold Shantz to the Philadelphia Phillies. He retired at the end of the 1964 season.)

For Brock, the move to St. Louis launched him on his Hall of Fame career as he led the Cardinals to the World Series. In 103 games, he hit .348 and scored 84 runs, with nine triples, 12 home runs, 44 RBIs and 33 stolen bases.

Lou Brock was a speedy outfield prospect when he was acquired by the St. Louis Cardinals in 1964. Sixteen seasons later – all with the Cardinals – he would retire with seven stolen base titles, more than 3,000 hits, and a place reserved in Cooperstown.

Lou Brock was a speedy outfield prospect when he was acquired by the St. Louis Cardinals in 1964. Sixteen seasons later – all with the Cardinals – he would retire with seven stolen base titles, more than 3,000 hits, and a place reserved in Cooperstown.

In the World Series against the New York Yankees, Brock was instrumental in helping St. Louis take the championship, batting .300 with 5 RBIs and nine hits in seven games, including two doubles and a home run.

Brock would be a standout performer for the Cardinals for the next decade and a half, batting a combined .297 (while batting .300 or better seven times), leading the league in stolen bases seven times and collecting over 2,700 hits (on his way to 3,023 hits for his career).

It was a trade that neither team – or its fans – would ever forget. (Or, in the case of Cubs’ fans, forgive.)

 

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How the Yankees Found Their Savior for 1964

 

Swap Shop: Pedro Ramos for PTBNL

On September 4, 1964, the New York Yankees looked like they might not repeat as American League champions after four consecutive pennants.

After going 7-10 for the Cleveland Indians in 1964, Pedro Ramos turned into a lights-out reliever for the Yankees in September, going 1-0 with eight saves and a 1.25 ERA in 13 relief appearances.

After going 7-10 for the Cleveland Indians in 1964, Pedro Ramos turned into a lights-out reliever for the Yankees in September, going 1-0 with eight saves and a 1.25 ERA in 13 relief appearances.

After beating the Kansas City Athletics that day, the Yankees found themselves in third place, three games behind the Baltimore Orioles and Chicago White Sox. The Yankees had been stuck in third place for nearly a month after leading the league at the end of July. They struggled through a 14-16 August, and were 2-2 thus far in September.

That was about to change in 24 hours.

On September 5, the Yankees announced that they had acquired pitcher Pedro Ramos from the Cleveland Indians for cash and players to be named later. Ramos had started and relieved for the Tribe, and brought with him a record of 7-10 with a 5.14 ERA.

Ramos was a proven innings-eater who had made a career of pitching for bad teams – and mostly losing. He led the American League in losses for four consecutive seasons from 1958 through 1961, when he lost 20 games for the Minnesota Twins. The Twins traded him to Cleveland in 1962, when he posted only the second winning season (9-8) of his nine-year career.

No one in the media saw Ramos as a season saver. But that’s what he turned out to be.

Over the final 24 games of the season, the Yankees would capture the American League pennant by winning 20 games. Ramos appeared in 13 of those games, finished 11 and saved eight games. He was 1-0 with a 1.25 ERA for the Yankees, and his addition, along with the emergence of Mel Stottlemyre following his call-up in August, propelled the Yankees to their fifth consecutive American league pennant.

The late-season acquisition of Pedro Ramos turned out to be a “buy now, pay later” bargain for the Yankees. After winning the 1964 pennant, the Yankees sent pitchers <a rel=

And best of all, the Yankees gave up nothing for Ramos until after the season. The players to be named later turned out to be two pitchers: right-hander Ralph Terry, who was 7-11 with a 4.54 ERA in 1964, and Bud Daley, a lefty who went 3-2 with a 4.63 ERA in 1964. Essentially, the Yankees traded two pitchers on the downside of their careers for a pennant. No brainer.

There was one downside for the Yankees. Since Ramos was acquired in September, he was not eligible for the World Series. They could have used him, dropping the 1964 World Series four games to three to the St. Louis Cardinals.

The Ramos acquisition continued to pay benefits to the Yankees in 1965. Working exclusively out of the bullpen, Ramos made 65 appearances in 1965 with a 5-5 record and a 2.92 ERA. He finished 42 games and saved 19, eighth most in the league.

He Brought His Heart to San Francisco

 

Swap Shop: How Billy Pierce Became a Giant … Who Saved a Pennant

In more than one way, Billy Pierce was the difference that got the San Francisco Giants into the 1962 World Series, and he accomplished this when he was generally considered washed up and a shell of what he had been a decade before.

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Billy Pierce was regarded by many as the best pitcher in the American League. In his prime during the 1950s, Billy Pierce was regarded by many as the best pitcher in the American League.

The glory years for Pierce came in the 1950s when, as the ace of the Chicago White Sox staff, he rivaled New York Yankees southpaw Whitey Ford for recognition as the best left-hander in the American League, if not the American League’s best pitcher, period.

Pierce was signed by the Detroit Tigers and traded to the White Sox in 1949. He was a combined 27-30 in his first two seasons with the White Sox, and then won 15 games in both 1951 and 1952, followed by an 18-12 campaign in 1953. After slipping to 9-10 in 1954, he won 15 games again in 1956 (while leading the major leagues with a 1.97 ERA) and was a 20-game winner for the White Sox in 1956 and in 1957. He led the league in complete games from 1956 through 1958, and overall posted a 186-152 record in 13 seasons with the White Sox.

In November of 1961, San Francisco sent Bob Farley, Eddie Fisher and Dom Zanni to the White Sox for Pierce and Don Larsen. It was one of the most important moves made by the Giants’ front office over that winter, as Pierce, who was 10-9 in his last season with Chicago, won his first eight decisions for the Giants. He moved to the bullpen through the heat of the summer, and returned to the starting rotation in August, winning five out of six decisions.

After going 10-9 in 1961, his final season with the White Sox, Billy Pierce was 16-6 for the Giants in 1962 – including a victory in the first game of the playoff with the Dodgers.

After going 10-9 in 1961, his final season with the White Sox, Billy Pierce was 16-6 for the Giants in 1962 – including a victory in the first game of the playoff with the Dodgers.

The 1962 National League regular season ended in a dead heat between the Giants and their West Coast rivals, the Los Angeles Dodgers. Finishing the regular season at 15-6, Pierce was selected by Giants manager Al Dark to pitch the opener of the three-game playoff and responded with a three-hit, 8-0 shutout. Game Two in Los Angeles saw the Dodgers tie the playoffs with an 8-7 victory.

On October 3, 1962, the playoff and the pennant race came down to a single game. In the top of the third, an RBI single by Harvey Kuenn and a sacrifice fly by second baseman Chuck Hiller gave the Giants a 2-0 lead. The Dodgers scored one run against Juan Marichal in the fourth inning and took the lead in the sixth inning on Tommy Davis’ two-run homer.

In the seventh inning, the Dodgers went up 4-2. In the top of the ninth, the Giants scored four runs on only two hits, and led 6-4 with the Dodgers coming up for their last at-bats.

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On two days’ rest after pitching a three-hit shutout, Billy Pierce closed out the Dodgers in the ninth inning of the third playoff game, preserving a come-from-behind victory and the National League pennant.

In the bottom of the ninth, Dark turned again to Pierce to wrap up the game and the pennant. After shutting out the Dodgers just two days before, Pierce added one more scoreless inning to his playoff ledger, retiring the Dodgers in order to give the Giants their first National League pennant since 1954.

 

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How a Traded Manager Brought the Mets a Miracle Center Fielder

 

Swap Shop: Tommie Agee’s Path to New York

He was a hot prospect during his rise through the Cleveland Indians’ farm system. And with the Chicago White Sox, he was the American League’s best rookie in 1966.

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But Tommie Agee will always be remembered best as the kid in center field who propelled the New York Mets to their first National league pennant, and then to the miracle that was the 1969 World Series.

Here’s how he got to New York:

Agee was raised in Mobile, Alabama and grew up with future Mets teammate Cleon Jones. He won a baseball scholarship to Grambling University, and was signed in 1961 by the Indians.

For five years he toiled in the Indians’ farm system, making short trips to the Cleveland roster, but hitting only .200 in a combined 53 at-bats for the Tribe. On January 20, 1965, Agee was traded with pitcher Tommy John and catcher John Romano to the White Sox in a three-team deal that sent outfielder Jim Landis to the Kansas City Athletics and brought Rocky Colavito back to Cleveland. After one more season in the minors, Agee had his breakout in 1966 with the White Sox. He batted .273 with 22 home runs and 86 runs batted in. He finished third in the American League in both runs scored (98) and stolen bases (44). He won the Gold Glove for his work in center field, and was a member of the All-Star team.

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Gil Hodges made acquiring Agee his first priority on joining the Mets in 1967 as the team’s new manager.

Agee came back to earth in 1967, batting .234 with 14 home runs and 52 RBIs. It would be his last season in Chicago.

Actually, two trades brought Agee to the Mets. The first involved former Dodgers first baseman Gil Hodges, for the previous five seasons the manager of the Washington Senators. Following the 1967 season, the Mets sent pitcher Bill Denehy and $100,000 to the Senators for Hodges to manage in New York. One of the first areas for improvement that Hodges wanted for the Mets was in center field. Hodges wanted defense and power. He specifically wanted Agee.

The Mets accommodated their new manager. On December 15, 1967, less than a month after Hodges joined the club, the Mets sent four players (including outfielder Tommy Davis and pitcher Jack Fisher) to the White Sox for Agee and infielder Al Weis. Both would play pivotal roles in the Mets’ 1969 World Series triumph.

One of Agee’s “miracles” in center field during the 1969 World Series.

One of Agee’s “miracles” in center field during the 1969 World Series.

 

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How Billy Bru Moved to Motown

 

Swap Shop: Bill Bruton for Frank Bolling

He was coming off the best overall season of his eight-year career. Then on December 7, 1960, Bill Bruton learned that he was no longer a member of the Milwaukee Braves, as he had been for his entire major league career.

Bill Bruton was solid at the plate and in the field. In 1961, his first season with the Detroit Tigers, he hit 17 home runs with 63 RBIs and led the America League in outfield putouts.

Bill Bruton was solid at the plate and in the field. In 1961, his first season with the Detroit Tigers, he hit 17 home runs with 63 RBIs and led the America League in outfield putouts.

The Detroit Tigers acquired Bruton in a trade that sent Gold Glove second baseman Frank Bolling to the Braves. Bolling was considered one of the best all-around second basemen in the American League, hitting .261 in six seasons with Detroit while averaging 21 doubles, 11 home runs and 52 RBIs per season. He won the Gold Glove in 1958, when he led all American League second sackers in fielding percentage.

The Braves finished second to the Pittsburgh Pirates in 1960, their second-straight runner-up finish after winning the National League pennant the previous two seasons. The Braves’ perennial All-Star second baseman, Red Schoendienst, was injured for most of 1959 and split time at second in 1960 with Chuck Cottier, a good defensive player with little pop in his bat. The Braves were looking to fill the hole at second base, and wanted the 29-year-old Bolling. They paid plenty to get him.

Bruton was the key player in the trade for the Tigers. He finished the 1960 season batting .286 with 27 doubles, 12 home runs and 54 RBIs. He stole 22 bases, his best total since 1955, and led the National League with 13 triples. The deal for Bolling also included Cottier, catcher Dick Brown and relief pitcher Terry Fox.

In Frank Bolling, the Milwaukee Braves acquired an All-Star second baseman who provided outstanding defense.

In Frank Bolling, the Milwaukee Braves acquired an All-Star second baseman who provided outstanding defense.

The deal was productive for both teams. Bruton played solid center field for the Tigers, flanked by sluggers Rocky Colavito in left field and Gold Glove winner Al Kaline in right. Bruton led all American league center fielders in putouts in 1961.

Bruton batted .257 in 1961 with 17 home runs and 63 RBIs. He again stole 22 bases, sixth best in the American League. He followed up with another fine season in 1962, batting .278 with 16 home runs and a career-best 74 runs batted in. Bruton finished his major league career with Detroit, hitting a combined .266 in four seasons.

Bolling had All-Star seasons for the Braves in 1961 and 1962. He batted .262 in 1961 with 15 home runs and 56 RBIs. He finished second in the league in putouts and double plays, and led all National League second basemen with a .988 fielding percentage. His .989 fielding percentage was best in the NL again in 1962, when Bolling batted .271 with nine home runs and 43 RBIs.

With both Bruton and Bolling performing as expected for their new teams, the “wild card” in the deal turned out to be reliever Terry Fox. The right-hander pitched six seasons for the Tigers, going 26-17 in 207 appearances, with a 2.77 ERA and 55 saves.

 

 

 

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Who’s Culp-able?

 

Swap Shop: How Ray Culp Came to Boston … via Chicago

Twice the Chicago Cubs made trades that involved pitcher Ray Culp. Both times the Cubs were “burned.” Yet both times Culp out-performed the “price” of his acquisition.

Ray Culp

Ray Culp

Culp had made his major league debut with the Philadelphia Phillies in 1963, winning 14 games and finishing third in the race for Rookie of the Year. He won 14 again in 1965, but after a 7-4 season in 1966, he was traded to the Chicago Cubs for left-hander Dick Ellsworth. Both pitchers spent only one, mostly unsuccessful season with their new teams. Ellsworth went 6-7 for the Phillies with a 4.38 ERA. He was shipped to the Boston Red Sox (with catcher Gene Oliver) in the off-season.

Culp fared only slightly better for the Cubs in 1967, going 8-11 with a 3.89 ERA in 22 starts.

Even though the Red Sox had won the pennant in 1967, they needed starting pitchers, especially after Cy Young winner Jim Lonborg broke a leg skiing. Ellsworth was one answer. Culp turned out to be another. The Cubs were willing to part with Culp for cash and Bill Schlesinger, a career minor leaguer.

Culp would prove to be a bargain for the Red Sox, as he was about to enter the most productive part of his career. He went 16-6 with a 2.91 ERA for the Red Sox in 1968 (while Ellsworth, the other former Cub on the Red Sox pitching staff, rebounded with a 16-7 season). Culp would be the ace of the Boston staff for the following three seasons, winning 48 games with a combined 3.47 earned run average.

Schlesinger, the outfielder Boston gave up to get Culp, would never make an official at-bat for the Cubs.