O’s Ace

 

Glancing Back, and Remembering Jim Palmer

Jim Palmer’s Hall of Fame career – 19 seasons, all in a Baltimore Orioles uniform – got its start in the 1960s, and nearly ended there. While showing flashes of brilliance in his early major league career – including being the youngest pitcher to throw a World Series shutout – assorted back and arm problems nearly ended his career before he could establish himself as one of the game’s most durable and consistent starters during the 1970s.

At age 20, Jim Palmer became the youngest pitcher to throw a World Series shutout, blanking the Los Angeles Dodgers 6-0 in 1966.

At age 20, Jim Palmer became the youngest pitcher to throw a World Series shutout, blanking the Los Angeles Dodgers 6-0 in 1966.

Palmer was signed by the Orioles in 1963 at age 17 and made his debut with the Orioles two years later, going 5-4 with a 3.72 ERA in 27 appearances – all but six in relief. He moved into the Orioles’ starting rotation in 1966, going 15-10 with a 3.46 ERA. He pitched the game that clinched the American League pennant for the Orioles, and pitched the second game of the 1966 World Series, shutting out the Dodgers 6-0 and beating Sandy Koufax (in what would turn out to be his final major league appearance).

Arm miseries plagued Palmer over the next two seasons. He pitched only nine innings in 1967 and spent the entire 1968 season in minor league rehab, during which time Palmer reworked his pitching mechanics. He re-emerged in 1969 showing signs of the pitcher he would become: going 16-4 with a 2.34 ERA and six shutouts. He also pitched a no-hitter against the Oakland A’s.

During the 1970s Palmer hit his stride, a stride that would carry him to Cooperstown. He won 20 or more games in eight of the next nine seasons. He led the American League in ERA in 1973 (2.40) and in 1975 (2.09), when he led the majors in wins (23) and shutouts (10).

After struggling with injuries and control, Jim Palmer emerged as a dominant pitcher in 1969, going 16-4 with a 2.34 ERA. He would be a 20-game winner eight times during the 1970s.

After struggling with injuries and control, Jim Palmer emerged as a dominant pitcher in 1969, going 16-4 with a 2.34 ERA. He would be a 20-game winner eight times during the 1970s.

Palmer retired after being released by the Orioles in 1984 with a record of 268-152 and a career ERA of 2.86. He was an All-Star six times, and was the first American League pitcher to win three Cy Young Awards. During his entire major league career, he never gave up a grand slam home run, or even back-to-back home runs.

Palmer remains the Orioles’ all-time career leader in games pitched, innings pitched, games started, wins, shutouts and strikeouts. He was elected to the Hall of Fame in 1990, his first year of eligibility.

 

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Hero to the Hapless

 

Glancing Back, and Remembering Jack Fisher

Right-hander Jack Fisher was 86-139 during an 11-year major league career. He played for five different teams, and pitched his best for baseball’s worst team ever, the New York Mets of the early 1960s.

Jack Fisher was part of the young pitching staff that propelled the Baltimore Orioles to pennant contention in the early 1960s. As a starter-reliever for the Orioles in 1960, Fisher was 12-11 with a 3.41 ERA … the last winning season of his career.

Jack Fisher was part of the young pitching staff that propelled the Baltimore Orioles to pennant contention in the early 1960s. As a starter-reliever for the Orioles in 1960, Fisher was 12-11 with a 3.41 ERA … the last winning season of his career.

Nicknamed “Fat Jack” by Hall of Fame pitcher Hoyt Wilhelm, Fisher was a large man who could throw hard and could pile up quality innings, a strength that made him more valuable than his won-lost record alone. Fisher was a good enough pitcher to be in the position to lose a lot of games. The teams he pitched for were bad enough to hang losses on him despite his talent and competitive grit.

Fisher signed with the Baltimore Orioles in 1957 and made his major league debut at age 20 in 1959, going 1-6 for the Orioles. Fisher won 12 games for the Orioles in 1960 and 10 in 1961. Because he threw hard, Fisher was susceptible to giving up home runs, and he gave up two of the most famous home runs of the early 1960s. He was on the mound in Boston for Ted Williams’ last at-bat in 1960, serving up the home run pitch that launched the Splendid Splinter into retirement. A year later, it was a Fisher pitch that Roger Maris sent into the seats for home run number 60, tying Babe Ruth’s single-season record.

Jack Fisher struggled through four seasons with the New York Mets, compiling a record of 38-73 with a combined 4.12 ERA.

Jack Fisher struggled through four seasons with the New York Mets, compiling a record of 38-73 with a combined 4.12 ERA.

Following a 7-9 1962 season, Fisher was traded to the San Francisco Giants in the deal that brought Mike McCormick and Stu Miller to Baltimore. After going 6-10 for the Giants in 1963, he was drafted by the New York Mets and was a starter for those woeful Mets teams over the next four seasons, going a combined 38-73. He led all National League pitchers in losses in 1965 (8-24) and 1967 (9-18).

The Mets dealt Fisher to the Chicago White Sox in December of 1967 in a six-player deal that brought Tommie Agee and Al Weis to New York. Fisher spent one season each with the White Sox (8-13 with a 2.99 ERA in 1968) and with the Cincinnati Reds (4-4 in 1969) before retiring. His career earned run average of 4.06 would have made him a winner with a lot of teams, but not with the Mets and White Sox of the 1960s.

Jack Fisher gave up two of the most famous home runs of the early 1960s: Ted Williams’ “farewell” home run in 1960, and Roger Maris’ 60th in 1961.

Jack Fisher gave up two of the most famous home runs of the early 1960s: Ted Williams’ “farewell” home run in 1960, and Roger Maris’ 60th in 1961.

 

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Leaving Nothing to Chance

 

Career Year: Dean Chance – 1964

In 1964, the closest thing to a sure thing in baseball was that any game with Dean Chance on the pitching mound had a better-than-good chance of ending up in a shutout.

Chance threw 11 shutouts in 1964 in 35 starts. In eight other starts, he allowed only one run.

Dean Chance won the Cy Young Award in 1964 with a 20-9 record and a 1.65 ERA.

Dean Chance won the Cy Young Award in 1964 with a 20-9 record and a 1.65 ERA.

At age 23, Chance not only had a career year. He had the kind of year that baseball had rarely seen since the Dead Ball Era.

Chance was signed out of high school in 1959 by the Baltimore Orioles. He spent two seasons in the Orioles’ farm system, winning 22 games … with no shutouts. Drafted by the expansion Washington Senators in 1960 and traded to the Los Angeles Angels in the same day, Chance spent one more season in the minors before posting a 14-10 record as a rookie in 1962. He was 13-18 in 1963 for a ninth-place Angels team.

Chance opened the 1964 season as a starter, but was called on just as often out of the bullpen. He was 1-0 with two saves at the end of April, and 3-2 with four saves by the end of May. He also recorded his first shutout in May, a 3-0 three-hitter versus the New York Yankees.

He made seven starts in June, winning two of them, both with shutouts. He pitched a two-hit shutout against the Boston Red Sox on June 2, striking out 15 batters. Three days later, Chance struck out 12 Yankees in a 2-0 loss. He shut out the Yankees over 13 innings, losing in the fourteenth.

Dean Chance led the major leagues with a 1.65 ERA in 1964. His 20-9 record that season included 11 shutouts.

Dean Chance led the major leagues with a 1.65 ERA in 1964. His 20-9 record that season included 11 shutouts.

Chance was 5-1 in July, pitching three more shutouts and winning one game in relief. He was 6-1 in August with four complete games, two of them shutouts. In the season’s last month, Chance was 4-3 in eight starts with three more shutouts, giving him 11 whitewashes on a 20-9 season. He tied for the American League lead in victories (with Chicago’s Gary Peters), and his 1.65 ERA was the best in baseball.

Chance also led the league with 15 complete games and 278.1 innings pitched. He allowed only seven home runs over the entire season, and gave up only 6.3 hits per every nine innings pitched. American League batters hit only .195 against him.

Dean Chance’s sterling performance in 1964 earned him the Cy Young Award. He finished fifth in the voting for Most Valuable Player.

 

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Blass from the Past

 

Glancing Back, and Remembering Steve Blass

The ace of the Pittsburgh Pirates pitching staff in the late 1960s, Steve Blass had a career that exemplified the shooting star, both in the height of his achievements and in their brevity. He came, he won, he faded into history, leaving behind a legacy of clutch wins and at times breathtaking performances that demonstrated why, at his best, he was among the best pitchers of his era.

In 1971, Steve Blass had one of his best seasons, going 15-8 with a 2.49 ERA and a league-leading five shutouts. He also won two World Series games.

In 1971, Steve Blass had one of his best seasons, going 15-8 with a 2.49 ERA and a league-leading five shutouts. He also won two World Series games.

Blass was signed by the Pirates in 1960 and never played for any other organization. He advanced through the Pirates’ farm system, slowly but steadily, and was successful at each level. He made his debut with the Pirates in 1964, going 5-8 with a 4.04 ERA as a spot starter and long reliever. He returned to Columbus in the International League in 1965, going 13-11 with a 3.07 ERA, and returned to the Pirates to stay in 1966 with a 11-7 record and a 3.87 ERA.

By 1968, Blass was the ace of the Pirates pitching staff, going 18-6 and leading the National League with a .750 winning percentage. His 2.12 earned run average was fifth best in the league, (teammate Bob Veale‘s 2.05 was third in the league) and his seven shutouts were third in the league behind Bob Gibson (13) and Don Drysdale (8) and tied with Jerry Koosman.

Blass won 16 games in 1969 and 10 games in 1970. The he strung together his two best seasons in leading the Pirates to back-to-back Eastern Division titles. Blass went 15-8 with a 2.49 ERA in 1971, leading the league with five shutouts. He won both of his World Series starts against the Baltimore Orioles. Blass outdueled O’s ace Mike Cuellar 5-1 in Game Three, pitching a three-hitter and striking out eight Orioles batters. Blass returned in Game Seven to pitch a 2-1 gem, allowing only four hits in winning the Series clincher for the Pirates.

In 1972, Blass was even better. He went 19-8 with a 2.49 ERA, pitching a career-high 249.2 innings. He was named to the National League All-Star team. In the National League Championship Series against the Cincinnati Reds, Blass won the opener 5-1, then pitched seven strong innings in Game Five, allowing only two runs on four hits in a game the Reds would win in the bottom of the ninth.

At age 31, Blass already had 100 career victories, 78 in the previous five seasons. He should have been at the peak of his career, but instead it was nearly at its end. He won only three games for the Pirates in 1973, and never won a major league game after that. For no explicable reason, he suddenly became plagued with chronic wildness, and never fully recovered, even during a return to the minors in 1974. He retired after being released by the Pirates that same year.

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Welcome to Wally’s World of Wins

 

Career Year: Wally Bunker – 1964

The Baltimore Orioles of the early 1960s were a fountain of young pitching talent, from the likes of Chuck Estrada, Milt Pappas and Steve Barber at the beginning of the decade to later arrivals such as Jim Palmer, for whom the 1960s were a struggle until he matured into the Hall of Fame bound ace of the O’s staff in the 1970s.

"19" was Wally Bunker's lucky number in 1964. The 19-year-old rookie won 19 games for the Baltimore Orioles and finished second in the voting for Rookie of the Year.

“19” was Wally Bunker’s lucky number in 1964. The 19-year-old rookie won 19 games for the Baltimore Orioles and finished second in the voting for Rookie of the Year.

One of the latest of the Baltimore “Kiddie Corps” was also one of the most immediately successful. Wally Bunker was a right-handed power pitcher who was the ace of the Orioles staff at age 19 and then retired from baseball by age 27.

Bunker was signed by the Orioles in 1963 and was a member of the starting rotation a year later. The 1964 season marked his career year, as Bunker was the ace of the Orioles staff, going 19-5 with a 2.69 ERA. He threw 12 complete games, second on the Orioles staff to Pappas. Bunker led the American League with a .792 winning percentage and pitched a pair of one-hitters. He finished second in the balloting for American League Rookie of the Year to the Minnesota Twins outfielder (and league batting champion) Tony Oliva.

In late September of 1964, Bunker felt something give in his right arm and was never the same pitcher, plagued by consistent arm miseries for the rest of his career. He was 10-8 for the Orioles in 1965 and 10-6 for the American League champion O’s in 1966. He was the winning pitcher in the third game of the 1966 World Series, beating the Los Angeles Dodgers 1-0 with a six-hitter and outdueling Dodger lefty Claude Osteen.

Wally Bunker closed out his major league career with the Kansas City Royals in 1969-1971. He threw the first pitch in Royals' history.

Wally Bunker closed out his major league career with the Kansas City Royals in 1969-1971. He threw the first pitch in Royals’ history.

Bunker struggled with arm problems over the next two seasons, going 3-7 in 1967 and 2-0 in only 18 appearances in 1968. He was selected by the Kansas City Royals in the 1968 expansion draft, and was the Opening Day starter, throwing the first pitch in Royals history. At 12-11, he was the team’s winningest pitcher in the Royals’ inaugural season, but was only 2-11 for Kansas City in 1970. He was released by the Royals after seven appearances in 1971, going 2-3 in his final season.

Bunker pitched for nine big league seasons, posting a 60-52 record with a career earned run average of 3.51.

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Quiet Production

 

Glancing Back, and Remembering Norm Siebern

Tall, athletic and bespectacled, Norm Siebern was a solid hitter who “grew up” professionally in the New York Yankees organization and blossomed into an All-Star outfielder and first baseman with the Kansas City Athletics. The New York papers – and even Yankees manager Casey Stengel – occasionally made sport of his quiet demeanor, but there was no question about the quality of his production, at bat and in the field.

Norm Siebern’s best season came with the Kansas City Athletcs in 1962, batting .308 with 25 home runs and 117 RBIs.

Norm Siebern’s best season came with the Kansas City Athletcs in 1962, batting .308 with 25 home runs and 117 RBIs.

Siebern was signed by the Yankees in 1951 and, after two years in the minors and a military tour, Siebern made his debut with the Yankees in 1956, hitting .204 in 54 games. The well-stocked Yankees outfield left no room for Siebern, so he returned to the minors in 1957, hitting .349 for Denver in the American Association, with 45 doubles, 15 triples, 24 home runs and 118 RBIs. He was named Sporting News Minor League Player of the Year for 1957.

That performance earned Siebern a permanent place on the Yankees roster in 1958, and he responded with 14 home runs, 55 RBIs and a .300 batting average. Siebern won the Gold Glove for his left field play, but ironically, it was pair of errors in the 1958 World Series that sent him to the bench for most of that Series.

Siebern hit .271 in 1959, and after the season was traded with Hank Bauer, Don Larsen and Marv Throneberry to the Kansas City Athletics for Joe DeMaestri, Kent Hadley and Roger Maris. He hit .279 for the A’s in 1960 with 19 home runs and 69 RBIs. His performance was overshadowed by the MVP season that Maris had for the Yankees.

Siebern’s hitting kept improving, especially as he spent more time at first base for the A’s. He batted .296 in 1961 with 36 doubles, 18 home runs and 98 RBIs. In 1962, Siebern hit .308 (fifth highest in the American League) with 25 doubles, 25 home runs and 117 RBIs (second in the AL to Harmon Killebrew‘s 126).

Norm Siebern had an outstanding rookie season for the New York Yankees in 1958, batting .300 and winning the Gold Glove in left field.

Norm Siebern had an outstanding rookie season for the New York Yankees in 1958, batting .300 and winning the Gold Glove in left field.

Siebern’s production fell off slightly in 1963, batting .272 with 16 home runs and 83 RBIs, and after that season he was traded to the Baltimore Orioles for first baseman Jim Gentile. He hit .245 for the Orioles in 1964 with 12 home runs and 56 RBIs, and he led the majors with 106 walks. In 1965, the O’s, to make room for Curt Blefary and Paul Blair, moved Boog Powell from the outfield to first base, limiting Siebern’s playing time. After that season he was traded to the California Angels for Dick Simpson, whom the Orioles later packaged in the trade for Frank Robinson.

Siebern hit .247 in 1966, his only season with the Angels. He was traded to the San Francisco Giants for outfielder Len Gabrielson, and in July of 1967 was purchased by the Boston Red Sox. A part-time player for Boston, Siebern was released by the Red Sox in August of 1968 and retired.

Siebern finished his 12-season major league career with a .272 batting average. He had 1,217 hits and 132 home runs. He was an All-Star from 1962 through 1964.

Welcome to the Homer Ward

 

Glancing Back, and Remembering Pete Ward

While it’s no overstatement to say that pitching dominated the 1960s, it’s just as safe to say that, in the 1960s, pitching dominated the Chicago White Sox, especially in that team’s contending seasons.

Pete Ward was the American League Rookie of the Year in 1963 with a .295 batting average, 22 home runs and 84 RBIs.

Pete Ward was the runner-up for American League Rookie of the Year in 1963 with a .295 batting average, 22 home runs and 84 RBIs.

With solid starting arms such as Gary Peters, Joe Horlen and Juan Pizarro, and relievers such as Hoyt Wilhelm and Eddie Fisher, the White Sox featured the league’s deepest staff. And they needed it, with also one of the weakest hitting lineups in the American League.

The one “power” spot in the White Sox lineup came from a left-handed batter named Pete Ward.

Ward was signed by the Baltimore Orioles in 1958 and appeared in eight games with the Orioles at the end of 1962. That winter he was a throw-in in the blockbuster trade that brought Ron Hansen, Dave Nicholson and Wilhelm to the White Sox for Luis Aparicio and Al Smith.

Ward replaced Smith at third for the White Sox and made an immediate impact, beating the Detroit Tigers on Opening Day with a seventh-inning home run, the start of an 18-game hitting streak. For the season Ward hit .295, fifth in the American League, with 22 home runs, 84 RBIs, and 80 runs. He finished second in the league in total bases (289), hits (177), and doubles (34), and was named American League Rookie of the Year.

Ward followed up in 1964 by hitting .282 with 23 home runs and 94 RBIs. An off-season auto accident led to back and neck problems that would plague him, and cut his offensive productivity, for the rest of his career. He slipped to 10 home runs in 1965 and only three in 1966.

Ward made something of a comeback in 1967 with 18 home runs and 62 RBIs, but the weak Chicago lineup meant fewer good pitches to hit. His 18 home runs led the team, with only two other White Sox hitting as many as 10 home runs that season. His walks increased to 61 in 1967, and then to 76 in 1968, when Ward hit .216 with 15 home runs and 50 RBIs.

Lingering injuries forced Ward into a part-time role in 1969, and he spent one year as a reserve player for the New York Yankees in 1970 before retiring.

Ward finished his nine-year career with a .254 batting average and 98 home runs.

Live Fast, Throw Hard.

 

Glancing Back, and Remembering Bo Belinsky

For a pitcher who posted only a single winning season in his career, Bo Belinsky acquired more fame per win than any major leaguer of his time or, perhaps, any time.

He was made for the spotlight, and his timing and location couldn’t have been better for attracting it.

As a rookie in 1962, Bp Belinsky was 10-11 with a 3.56 ERA. He also pitched the first no-hitter in Angels history that season.

As a rookie in 1962, Bo Belinsky was 10-11 with a 3.56 ERA. He also pitched the first no-hitter in Angels history that season.

During the early years of the Los Angeles Angels, the left-handed throwing Belinsky teamed with fellow starter Dean Chance for one of the most formidable rookie righty-lefty tandems in the American League. Belinsky was originally signed by the Pittsburgh Pirates in 1956 and spent time in the farm systems of both the Pirates and the Baltimore Orioles before being acquired in the 1961 expansion draft by the Angels.

Belinsky fired the first no-hitter in Angels franchise history during his rookie season of 1962. He started the season at 7-1, finished at 10-11 with a 3.56 ERA, and led the American league with 122 bases on balls. Belinsky won only two games for the Angels in 1963, and bounced back with a 9-8 record and a 2.86 ERA in 1964. He would win only seven more games during the five seasons remaining in his career, five seasons split between the Phillies, Astros, Pirates and Reds.

Bo Belinsky's active night life off the field made him a favorite media target. He's pictured here with teammate Dean Chance and Mamie Van Doren.

Bo Belinsky’s active night life off the field made him a favorite media target. He’s pictured here with teammate Dean Chance and Mamie Van Doren.

So what made Bo Belinsky memorable? A few brilliant moments on the field were overshadowed with a life in the fast lane that was poison to his career but a boon for every reporter that hung around Belinsky. The young Bo loved to party, and loved being seen in public with beautiful women. He was the playboy pitcher who tossed a no-hitter and then went bar-hopping with the likes of Ann-Margret and Mamie Van Doren. He held press conferences at poolside bars. What’s not to like?

Over eight major league seasons, Belinsky finished with a career record of 28-51 and a 4.10 ERA. He had great stuff, but he didn’t have the control to make the most of it. So was his a career of under-achieving, or making the most of limited abilities amid a youth well-lived?

 

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Robbie’s Revenge

 

Career Year – Frank Robinson (1966)

Frank Robinson was not only a great baseball talent. He was also someone you didn’t want to make angry.

That’s what Cincinnati Reds general manager Bill DeWitt did when he justified the 1966 trade of Robinson to the Baltimore Orioles by calling the slugger an “old 30.”

Frank Robinson finished the 1966 season as the American League Triple Crown winner with a .316 batting average, 49 home runs and 122 RBIs

Frank Robinson finished the 1966 season as the American League Triple Crown winner with a .316 batting average, 49 home runs and 122 RBIs.

The Orioles should be forever grateful to DeWitt for not only shipping the 1961 National League Most Valuable Player to Baltimore, but also for stoking Robbie’s competitive fire with the “old” comment. Robinson tore through American League pitching from Opening Day on (he hit a home run in each of the first three games). At the All-Star break, he was hitting .312 with 21 home runs and 56 RBIs, and he hit even better in the season’s second half, finishing 1966 as the American League Triple Crown winner with a .316 batting average, 49 home runs and 122 RBIs.

Offensively, the 1966 season produced a career-best for Robinson only in the home run category. He had had better seasons in hits, doubles, runs batted in, runs scored and batting average. And in his 21-year career, he was the league leader in home runs, RBIs and batting average only once each – all in 1966.

In his 21-year career, Frank Robinson was the league leader in home runs, RBIs and batting average only once each – all in 1966.

In his 21-year career, Frank Robinson was the league leader in home runs, RBIs and batting average only once each – all in 1966.

In a game on September 21, 1966, Robinson’s performance was not only outstanding, but mostly typical for his 1966 productivity. The Kansas City Athletics had built a 6-1 lead through the fifth inning. In the top of the seventh, Robinson cut the lead to three runs with a two-run homer off the A’s ace reliever Jack Aker. In the top of the eighth, the Orioles chased Aker and the four Kansas City relievers who followed him with seven runs, capped by Robinson’s second two-run homer of the game.

The victory clinched the American League pennant for Baltimore … and, for all intents and purposes, it cemented Robbie as the American League’s MVP, the first player to win that award in each league.

 

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Screwball Success

 

Glancing Back, and Remembering Mike Cuellar

Mike Cuellar emerged as an All-Star pitcher in the late 1960s, and then became one of the game’s best starters during the first half of the 1970s.

In 1969, Mike  Cuellar's first season with the Baltimore Orioles, he went 23-11 with a 2.38 ERA and tying for the <a rel=

A native of Cuba, Cuellar was originally signed by the Cincinnati Redlegs and appeared in two games for the Reds at the end of 1959. Cuellar spent the next five seasons pitching in the minor leagues and in Mexico, finally drifting into the St. Louis Cardinals organization and going 5-5 with a 4.50 ERA in 1964. He was used primarily as a reliever for St. Louis, making only seven starts in his 32 appearances, and after the season was traded by the Cardinals with Ron Taylor to the Houston Astros for Chuck Taylor and Hal Woodeshick.

As a reliever for the Astros, Cuellar went 1-4 with a 3.54 ERA in 1965. But the following season Cuellar was moved into the starting rotation, and his career took off. He was 12-10 as a starter for the Astros with a 2.22 ERA in 1966, and followed up in 1967 with 16-11 record and a 3.03 ERA. He led the Astros staff in innings pitched (246.1), complete games (16), shutouts (three – tied with Don Wilson), and strikeouts (203). Cuellar’s record slipped to 8-11 in 1968 (with a 2.74 ERA), and he was traded with Elijah Johnson (minors) and Enzo Hernandez to the Baltimore Orioles for John Mason (minors) and Curt Blefary.

In 1967, Mike Cuellar set an Astros team record for wins in a season. He was 16-11 with a 3.03 ERA.

In 1967, Mike Cuellar set an Astros team record for wins in a season. He was 16-11 with a 3.03 ERA.

That trade was the best thing that ever happened to his career. Cuellar became the ace of the Orioles’ staff, going 23-11 with a 2.38 ERA and tying for the Cy Young award with Detroit’s Denny McLain. Cuellar went 24-8 for the Orioles in 1970, and 20-9 in 1971. He won 18 games in each of the next 2 seasons, and posted a 22-10 record in 1974. Overall, in his eight seasons with the Orioles, Cuellar posted a 143-88 record for a sparkling .619 winning percentage. He averaged 18 victories per season and 3.18 earned runs per nine innings pitched.

Cuellar was also a good-hitting pitcher, batting .115 for his hitting career (shortened by the designated hitter rule) with seven home runs and 33 RBIs. He was the first player to hit a grand slam in a League Championship Series, coming in 1970 against the Minnesota Twins. He remains the only pitcher to hit a grand slam in any League Championship Series.

Cuellar appeared in two games for the California Angels in 1977 before retiring with a career record of 185-130. A four-time All-Star, Cuellar was 4-4 pitching in five American League Championship Series and in three World Series.

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