300 and Counting

 

This Week in 1960s Baseball

(August 11, 1961) The Milwaukee Braves today defeated the 2-1 behind the six-hit pitching of Warren Spahn.

Warren Spahn's 12th victory of the 1961 season was also his 12th complete game ... and the 300th win of his career.

Warren Spahn’s 12th victory of the 1961 season was also his 12th complete game … and the 300th win of his career.

For Spahn (12-12), it marked the 300th victory of his career, and made Spahn the thirteenth pitcher in major league history to reach the 300-victory plateau. He was also the first 300-game winner in two decades, following Lefty Grove in 1941.

Spahn drove in the game’s first run in the fifth inning with a sacrifice fly that brought home catcher Joe Torre. The Cubs tied the game at 1-1 in the sixth inning. Ron Santo scored on an Andre Rodgers RBI single.

Braves center fielder Gino Cimoli hit a solo home run in the bottom of the eighth inning off Cubs starter Jack Curtis (7-7). Curtis and Spahn each allowed just six hits.

For Spahn, the victory marked his twelfth complete game of the season … and Spahn would lead the National League in complete games in 1961 for the fifth consecutive season. He would also lead the league in ERA (3.02) and victories at 21-13.

And he still had 63 victories left in his 40-year-old arm.

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Making 20 Wins a Habit

 

Glancing Back, and Remembering Ferguson Jenkins

During the late 1960s, Ferguson Jenkins did something no Chicago Cubs pitcher had done in more than half a century: string together one 20-win season after another.

From 1967-1972, Ferguson Jenkins averaged 21 victories, 23 complete games and 306 innings per season for the Chicago Cubs.

From 1967-1972, Ferguson Jenkins averaged 21 victories, 23 complete games and 306 innings per season for the Chicago Cubs.

From 1967 through 1972, Fergie Jenkins had no less than 20 victories per season, pitched no less than 289.1 innings per season, pitched no less than 20 complete games each season, with a combined ERA of 3.00 for those six seasons, all the while pitching about half his games in that hitter’s paradise known as Wrigley Field.

It was one of the most amazing – and largely overlooked – pitching performances of his era. He was the Three-Finger Brown of the 1960s, only with a livelier ball and much less run support.

Jenkins was originally signed by the Philadelphia Phillies in 1962. After four seasons in the Phillies’ farm system, Jenkins was traded with John Hernnstein and Adolfo Phillips for two proven starting pitchers – Larry Jackson and Bob Buhl. What the Cubs got was a future Hall of Famer.

After an undistinguished season spent mostly in the bullpen, Jenkins was converted to a full-time starter for the 1967 season and never looked back. He went 20-13 for the Cubs with a 2.80 ERA and led the majors with 20 complete games. In 1968 he went 20-15 with a 2.63 ERA. He lost five 1-0 games that season. With a little more run support, he could have easily been 25-10.

Ferguson Jenkins was 20-15 in 1968 with a 2.63 ERA. Five of those losses came on 1-0 defeats.

Ferguson Jenkins was 20-15 in 1968 with a 2.63 ERA. Five of those losses came on 1-0 defeats.

Jenkins’ best season with the Cubs came in 1971, when his 24-13 record (with a 2.77 ERA) led the National League in victories. He also led the league in games started (39), complete games (30), innings pitched (325) and strikeouts-to-walks ratio (7.11). He was selected as the National League Cy Young Award winner for that season.

After six consecutive 20-victory seasons, Jenkins slipped to 14-16 in 1973. The Cubs shipped the 30-year-old pitcher to the Texas Rangers for Vic Harris and Bill Madlock. Jenkins responded with a 25-12 season for the Rangers, pitching six shutouts and 29 complete games with a 2.82 ERA.

In a sense, the Cubs had been right, as Jenkins “declined” from phenomenal in the late 1960s-early 1970s to simply very good in the late ‘70s and early 1980s. The Cubs simply missed out on the 135 wins that Jenkins accumulated after being traded.

Jenkins finished his 19-season Hall of Fame career with 284 victories and a 3.34 ERA. He pitched over 4500 innings with 3,192 strikeouts, and was enshrined in Cooperstown in 1991.

 

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Speed Wizard

 

Glancing Back, and Remembering Jose Cardenal

Jose Cardenal built an 18-year major league career on speed: bat speed, speed in the outfield, and speed on the base paths. A line-drive hitter with an accurate throwing arm, Cardenal provided solid, consistent play for nine different major league teams.

Jose Cardenal’s best season came in 1972 when he 17 home runs with 70 RBIs for the Chicabo Cubs. He batted a combined .301 for the Cubs from 1972-1976.

Jose Cardenal’s best season came in 1972 when he 17 home runs with 70 RBIs for the Chicago Cubs. He batted a combined .301 for the Cubs from 1972-1976.

Cardenal was signed by the San Francisco Giants in 1960 and made his debut with the team at the end of the 1963 season. The Giants traded Cardenal to the California Angels in November 1964, and Cardenal became the Angels’ starting center fielder in 1965, hitting .250 with 37 stolen bases (second in the American League to his cousin, Bert Campaneris). He hit .276 for the Angels in 1966 with 16 home runs and 48 RBIs.

Injuries limited his productivity in 1967, and Cardenal was traded to the Cleveland Indians for outfielder Chuck Hinton. He hit .257 for Cleveland in each of the next two seasons. His 40 stolen bases in 1968 were second highest in the American League (again to Campaneris). Then Cardenal was traded to the St. Louis Cardinals for Vada Pinson.

Jose Cardenal stole 40 bases for the Cleveland Indians in 1968, finishing second to league leader Bert Campaneris for the second time.

Jose Cardenal stole 40 bases for the Cleveland Indians in 1968, finishing second to league leader Bert Campaneris for the second time.

Cardenal split the next two seasons between the Cardinals and the Milwaukee Brewers. He hit .293 for St. Louis in 1970, and had a career high 80 RBIs in 1971. Prior to the 1972 season, Cardinal was traded to the Chicago Cubs, where he stayed for six seasons, his longest tenure with any single team. He hit .291 for the Cubs in 1972 with 17 home runs (career high) and 70 RBIs. He hit .303 in 1973, .293 in 1974, and .317 in 1975, averaging 70 RBIs per season in his first four seasons with the Cubs.

From 1978 through 1980, Cardenal played for the Philadelphia Phillies, New York Mets and Kansas City Royals. He retired in 1980 with 1,913 hits and a .275 career batting average.

Best Day of the Weak

 

Glancing Back, and Remembering Rick Monday

Coming up with the American League’s perennial also-rans in Kansas City, Rick Monday quickly established himself as one of the best players in the Athletics’ line-up and one of the best all-around players in the league.

As a rookie with the Kansas City Athletics in 1967, Rick Monday batted .251 with 14 home runs and 58 RBIs.

As a rookie with the Kansas City Athletics in 1967, Rick Monday batted .251 with 14 home runs and 58 RBIs.

A native of Arkansas, Monday starred for the Arizona State Sun Devils, leading the team to the 1965 NCAA championship (while playing with future teammate and Hall of Famer Reggie Jackson). Monday was the first overall selection in the inaugural Major League First-Year Player Draft in 1965, taken by the Kansas City Athletics. He appeared in 17 games for the A’s at the end of the 1966 season, and then batted .251 with 14 home runs and 54 RBIs in his 1967 rookie campaign.

Monday was an All-Star in 1968, when he hit .274 for the now Oakland Athletics. He batted .271 in 1969, .290 in 1970 and slipped to .245 in 1971. In November of 1971, the A’s dealt Monday to the Chicago Cubs for pitcher Ken Holtzman, and Monday was to become a mainstay in the Cubs’ outfield for the next five seasons, hitting a combined .270. His best season in Chicago was 1976, when he hit .272 and had career bests in home runs (32) and RBIs (77).

In 1977 Monday was traded with Mike Garman to the Los Angeles Dodgers for Jeff Albert (minors), Bill Buckner and Ivan De Jesus. He spent his last eight major league seasons with the Dodgers, hitting a combined .254 and providing the team’s best center field play since the departure of Willie Davis.

Rick Monday’s best season came with the Chicago Cubs in 1976. He hit 32 home runs, drove in 77 runs and scored 107 runs – all career highs.

Rick Monday’s best season came with the Chicago Cubs in 1976. He hit 32 home runs, drove in 77 runs and scored 107 runs – all career highs.

After so many years of consistently performing well for second-division teams, Monday finally tasted World Series success as a member of the Dodgers in 1981. He was primarily a utility player when he hit the deciding home run in the National League Championship Series. Monday drilled a two-out, ninth-inning homer that proved to be the difference in a 2-1 victory over the Montreal Expos, a victory that elevated the Dodgers to the World Series where they dispatched the New York Yankees in six games.

Monday lasted for 19 big league seasons, hitting a combined .264 with 1,619 hits over his career. He was twice an All-Star, once in each league.

The Power in Polo

 

Homer Happy: Frank Thomas

From their inaugural season of 1962 until 1975, the New York Mets’ single-season record for home runs belonged to a right-handed hitting outfielder who played for the Mets for only two seasons, but was a National League power threat for a decade.

With 34 home runs in 1962 – the Mets’ first year of existence – Frank Thomas held the franchise’s single-season home run record until 1975.

With 34 home runs in 1962 – the Mets’ first year of existence – Frank Thomas held the franchise’s single-season home run record until 1975.

Slugger Frank Thomas played both the outfield and first base for seven different teams in 16 years. Over that long career, he batted .266 with 286 home runs and 962 RBIs.

Thomas signed with the Pittsburgh Pirates in 1947 and made his major league debut in 1951. In 1953, his first full major league season, Thomas batted .255 for the Pirates with 30 home runs and 102 RBIs. He was an All-Star three times in his five full seasons with Pittsburgh, and had his best season in 1958 with 35 home runs and 109 RBIs.

In 1959, Thomas was traded to the Cincinnati Reds in the deal that brought Smoky Burgess, Harvey Haddix and Don Hoak to the Pirates. Thomas spent one season in Cincinnati (12 home runs, 47 RBIs) and then was traded to the Chicago Cubs. With the Cubs, he hit 21 home runs with 64 RBIs in 1960, and a month into the 1961 season he was traded to the Milwaukee Braves. He had a solid season for the Braves, hitting 25 home runs plus two with the Cubs. The Braves team of 1961 was loaded with power hitters, and was the first major league club to smash four consecutive home runs in a game. (Thomas hit the fourth, preceded by home runs from the bats of Eddie Mathews, Hank Aaron, and Joe Adcock.)

Frank Thomas broke into the big leagues in a big way. In 1953, his first full season with the Pittsburgh Pirates, Thomas hit 30 home runs with 102 RBIs.

Frank Thomas broke into the big leagues in a big way. In 1953, his first full season with the Pittsburgh Pirates, Thomas hit 30 home runs with 102 RBIs.

After the 1961 season, he was traded to the Mets for outfielder Gus Bell. He led that first Mets team with 34 home runs and 94 RBIs. His home run mark was not topped by another Mets hitter until Dave Kingman blasted 36 in 1975.

Thomas hit 15 home runs for the Mets in 1963 and was traded to the Philadelphia Phillies in 1964. At this point in his career, the 35-year-old Thomas had become a part-time player and pinch hitter, batting .282 in two seasons with the Phillies. He retired in 1966 with 1,671 career hits.

Too Much, Too Soon?

 

Glancing Back, and Remembering Glen Hobbie

Before the New York Mets established a new standard for futility with their arrival in 1962, the poster children for disastrous baseball in the National League was an ongoing contest between the Philadelphia Phillies and the Chicago Cubs.

Pitching for either team in the early 1960s was hardly a treat. An ERA under 4.00 could still earn you 20 losses in a season.

Glen Hobbie was a back-to-back 16-game winner for the Chicago Cubs in 1959-1960.

Glen Hobbie was a back-to-back 16-game winner for the Chicago Cubs in 1959-1960.

Just ask Glen Hobbie, a right-hander for the Cubs who deserved more victories than he got.

Hobbie was signed by the Cubs in 1955. His rookie season of 1958 produced a 10-6 record with a 3.74 ERA as a starter and reliever, making him the Cubs’ leader in wins. He followed up in 1959 with a 16-13 campaign and a 3.69 ERA. He led the Cubs’ staff in complete games (10), shutouts (3), and strikeouts (138).

For the most part, Hobbie’s best season was 1960, when he repeated his 16-win performance … but also led the National League with 20 losses. He set career highs in starts (36), complete games (16), shutouts (four), and innings pitched (258.2). He led Cubs’ starters in each of those categories except ERA (Dick Ellsworth turned in a 3.72 earned run average). He was also used 10 times in relief, finishing five games and saving one.

He was used every way a pitcher could be used. And he was never the same again.

Hobbie’s won-loss record slipped dramatically over the next three years: to 7-13 in 1961, 5-14 in 1962, and 7-10 in 1963. His earned run average over those three seasons was 4.45.

In 1964, the Cubs traded Hobbie to the St. Louis Cardinals for Lew Burdette. He appeared in 13 games for the Cardinals, going 1-2 with a 4.26 ERA, and then was assigned to the minors. He never pitched again at the major league level, even after he was acquired by the Detroit Tigers in 1965.

Hobbie finished his eight-year major league career with a record of 62-81 and a 4.20 earned run average.

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How Lou Flew to St. Loo

 

Swap Shop: Lou Brock for Ernie Broglio

It was probably the most lopsided trade of the 1960s. (After all, Milt Pappas was 30-29 in two-plus seasons for the Cincinnati Reds.)

At first, it looked like a “steal” for the Chicago Cubs. It turned out that the St. Louis Cardinals added a base thief who would be pivotal in helping them steal the 1964 National League pennant.

Ernie Broglio was the key player the Chicago Cubs coveted in the Lou Brock deal. Coming off an 18-8 season with the Cardinals in 1963, Broglio would win only seven games for the Cubs before retiring in 1966.

Ernie Broglio was the key player the Chicago Cubs coveted in the Lou Brock deal. Coming off an 18-8 season with the Cardinals in 1963, Broglio would win only seven games for the Cubs before retiring in 1966.

The Cardinals sent two former 20-game winners, Ernie Broglio and Bobby Shantz, along with outfielder Doug Clemens, to the Cubs for pitchers Jack Spring and Paul Toth, and an outfielder named Lou Brock.

From the Cubs’ perspective, Broglio was the key player in the deal. He was a proven winner, notching 21 victories in 1960 and leading the Cardinals in 1963 with an 18-8 record and a 2.99 ERA. From 1960-1963, Broglio averaged 15 wins and 218 innings per season, with a combined ERA of 3.15.

But that wasn’t the Ernie Broglio that the Cubs received in exchange for Brock.

In 11 starts for the Cardinals in 1964, Broglio was 3-5 with a 3.50 ERA. A change of scenery didn’t help. Over the rest of the 1964 campaign, Broglio was 4-7 with a 4.04 ERA for the Cubs.

And the other players acquired by the Cubs didn’t help to compensate for Broglio’s slide. In 20 relief appearances with the Cubs, Shantz was 0-1 with a 5.56 ERA and a single save. And Clemens batted .279 with two home runs and 12 RBIs in 54 games.

(In August, the Cubs sold Shantz to the Philadelphia Phillies. He retired at the end of the 1964 season.)

For Brock, the move to St. Louis launched him on his Hall of Fame career as he led the Cardinals to the World Series. In 103 games, he hit .348 and scored 84 runs, with nine triples, 12 home runs, 44 RBIs and 33 stolen bases.

Lou Brock was a speedy outfield prospect when he was acquired by the St. Louis Cardinals in 1964. Sixteen seasons later – all with the Cardinals – he would retire with seven stolen base titles, more than 3,000 hits, and a place reserved in Cooperstown.

Lou Brock was a speedy outfield prospect when he was acquired by the St. Louis Cardinals in 1964. Sixteen seasons later – all with the Cardinals – he would retire with seven stolen base titles, more than 3,000 hits, and a place reserved in Cooperstown.

In the World Series against the New York Yankees, Brock was instrumental in helping St. Louis take the championship, batting .300 with 5 RBIs and nine hits in seven games, including two doubles and a home run.

Brock would be a standout performer for the Cardinals for the next decade and a half, batting a combined .297 (while batting .300 or better seven times), leading the league in stolen bases seven times and collecting over 2,700 hits (on his way to 3,023 hits for his career).

It was a trade that neither team – or its fans – would ever forget. (Or, in the case of Cubs’ fans, forgive.)

 

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A Ray of Winning Sunshine

 

Glancing Back, and Remembering Ray Culp

Ray Culp was a strapping Texan who threw hard and won often. In fact, from 1963 through 1970, the right-hander had only a single losing season – his only season as a member of the Chicago Cubs.

Ray Culp had an outstanding rookie season with the Philadelphia Phillies in 1963, going 14-11 with a 2.97 ERA.

Ray Culp had an outstanding rookie season with the Philadelphia Phillies in 1963, going 14-11 with a 2.97 ERA.

Culp was signed by the Philadelphia Phillies in 1959 and worked his way through the Phillies’ farm system to make the big league club as a member of the starting rotation in 1963. He was 14-11 as a rookie with a 2.97 ERA, pitching 203.1 innings with 10 complete games and five shutouts. He was selected that year as The Sporting News National League Rookie Pitcher of the Year and was a member of the National League All-Star team.

He was 8-7 in 1964 and followed in 1965 with a 14-10 record and a 3.22 ERA, third on the team in victories behind Jim Bunning and Chris Short. He moved to the bullpen in 1966, going 7-4 with a 5.04 ERA, and then was traded to the Chicago Cubs for Dick Ellsworth.

Culp went 8-11 for the Cubs in 1967, and then was acquired by the Boston Red Sox, where his career took off to reflect the promise he showed in his rookie season. Culp was 16-6 for Boston in 1968 with a 2.91 ERA. He pitched 11 complete games for the Red Sox with six shutouts.

Ray Culp’s career rebounded when he was acquired by the Boston Red Sox in 1968. He was 71-58 with a 3.50 ERA in six seasons with the Red Sox.

Ray Culp’s career rebounded when he was acquired by the Boston Red Sox in 1968. He was 71-58 with a 3.50 ERA in six seasons with the Red Sox.

Culp followed up in 1969 with a 17-8 season and a 3.81 ERA. He also earned a spot on the American League All-Star team that season. Culp was 17-14 for Boston in 1970 with a 3.04 ERA and 15 complete games in 33 starts. He was fifth in the league in strikeouts with 197. It was his last winning season.

Culp’s record slipped to 14-16 in 1971 with a 3.60 ERA, but by this time his arm was effectively pitched out. He was 5-8 for Boston in 1972, and made only 10 appearances in 1973, going 2-6. He was released by the Red Sox following the 1973 season, and retired at age 31.

Culp finished his 11-year major league career with a record of 122-101 and a 3.58 ERA.

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The Write Kind of Relief

 

Oh, What a Relief: Jim Brosnan

Jim Brosnan was one of the true pioneers of unvarnished sports journalism. His 1959 expose, The Long Season, while tame by today’s standards, was the first book of its kind, revealing life in the major leagues and preceding by a decade Jim Bouton‘s tell-all best-seller Ball Four.

Jim Brosnan was a key contributor to the Cincinnati Reds’ 1961 pennant. As the Reds’ bullpen ace, Brosnan was 10-4 with a 3.04 ERA and 16 saves.

Jim Brosnan was a key contributor to the Cincinnati Reds’ 1961 pennant. As the Reds’ bullpen ace, Brosnan was 10-4 with a 3.04 ERA and 16 saves.

The publication of The Long Season also coincided with what would be Brosnan’s most effective period as a major league reliever. He proved to be a major contributor to the Cincinnati Reds‘ pennant-winning season of 1961.

Brosnan was signed by the Chicago Cubs in 1946 and made his first appearance for the Cubs in 1954, when he went 1-0 in 18 relief appearances. He made the Chicago roster to stay in 1956, posting a 5-9 record as a starter and reliever with a 3.79 ERA. In 1957, working almost entirely out of the Cubs’ bullpen, Brosnan went 5-5 in 41 appearances.

In May of 1958, Brosnan was traded to the St. Louis Cardinals for veteran shortstop Al Dark. He went 11-8 that season with a 3.35 ERA, working as both a starter and as a reliever. But from this point in his career on, Brosnan would find himself relied on more and more as a reliever, and with more and more success in that role.

After the start of the 1959 season, Brosnan was traded to the Reds for Hal Jeffcoat. He had a combined record of 9-6 in 1959, and emerged as the Reds’ relief ace in 1960 with a 7-2 record in 57 appearances, all but two in relief. Brosnan posted a 2.36 ERA and recorded 12 saves for the Reds in 1960.

Jim Brosnan’s 1960 memoir, The Long Season, was one of the first sports books to give fans an authentic glimpse of what happened in the clubhouse. It chronicled Brosnan’s 1959 season with the Cardinals and Reds.

Jim Brosnan’s 1960 memoir, The Long Season, was one of the first sports books to give fans an authentic glimpse of what happened in the clubhouse. It chronicled Brosnan’s 1959 season with the Cardinals and Reds.

In 1961, as Cincinnati claimed the National League pennant for the first time in more than two decades, Brosnan had his best season, going 10-4 with a 3.04 ERA in 53 relief appearances. He also posted a career-high 16 saves, closing for a starting rotation that featured Joey Jay, Jim O’Toole and Bob Purkey.

Brosnan went 4-4 for Cincinnati in 1962 with a 3.34 ERA and 13 saves. In 1963 he was traded to the Chicago White Sox for pitcher Dom Zanni, and finished the 1963 season at 3-8 with a combined ERA of 3.13 and 14 saves, all with the White Sox. At the end of the 1963 season he was released by Chicago, and retired at age 33.

During his nine-season major league career, Brosnan compiled a 55-47 record with 67 saves and a 3.54 ERA.

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Swooping Out of the Bullpen

 

Oh, What a Relief: Phil Regan

Right-handed pitcher Phil Regan (aka, the “Vulture”) began his 13-year major league career as a starter with the Detroit Tigers. But his greatest success on the mound came after he converted to a relief specialist, where he dominated National League batters from 1966-1969.

After struggling as a starting pitcher for six seasons with the Detroit Tigers, Phil Regan was traded to the Los Angeles Dodgers and established himself as one of the best relievers in the National League. In 1966, he was 14-1 with a 1.62 ERA and a league-leading total of 21 saves.

After struggling as a starting pitcher for six seasons with the Detroit Tigers, Phil Regan was traded to the Los Angeles Dodgers and established himself as one of the best relievers in the National League. In 1966, he was 14-1 with a 1.62 ERA and a league-leading total of 21 saves.

Regan was signed by the Tigers in 1956 and made his major league debut in Detroit in 1960. In six seasons with the Tigers, Regan was 42-44 with a 4.50 ERA. His best season in Detroit came in 1963, when he was 15-9 with a 3.86 earned run average, his only season with the Tigers when he registered an ERA under 4.00.

Following a 1-5 season in 1965, the Tigers traded Regan to the Los Angeles Dodgers for infielder Dick Tracewski. The Dodgers converted him to a reliever and the impact on his career – and on the Dodgers’ pennant-winning 1966 season – was immediate, and immense. Regan appeared in 65 games, all in relief, finishing 48 and saving 21, leading the National League in both of those pitching categories. His earned run average dropped to 1.62 and he posted a 14-1 record.

As the Dodgers’ fortunes dipped in 1967, so did Regan’s record. He finished that season at 6-9 with six saves and a 2.99 ERA. He appeared in five games for the Dodgers in 1968, winning two, before being traded with outfielder Jim Hickman to the Chicago Cubs for Jim Ellis and Ted Savage. The magic returned with his change of teams. Over the rest of the 1968 season, Regan was 10-5 with a 2.20 ERA. He appeared in 68 games for the Cubs, finishing 60 and saving 25, again leading the league in saves.

Regan remained the Cubs’ bullpen ace in 1969, appearing in 71 games and saving 17. He finished the 1969 season at 12-6 with a 3.70 ERA. From 1966-1969, he posted a combined record of 44-21 with 69 saves and a 2.60 ERA.

His numbers declined gradually in 1970 and 1971, going 10-14 with a 4.35 ERA and 18 saves over those two seasons. He was purchased by the Chicago White Sox in June of 1972 and was released later that season. He spent the next 30 years as a pitching coach and manager.

In 13 major league seasons, Regan compiled a record of 96-81 with a 3.84 ERA and 92 saves. He was named to the National League All-Star team in 1966.

 

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