Too Good to Double Up

 

Glancing Back, and Remembering Don Buford

Don Buford combined speed and bat control to end his 10-year major league career as the player least likely to hit into a double play – among all players in major league history. In 4,553 official at-bats, Buford grounded into double plays only 34 times in his career. He averaged 1 GDP for every 138 at-bats. Continue reading

Blockbuster Deal Sends Wilhelm to White Sox

 

Swap Shop – Chicago and Baltimore Trade Future Hall of Famers

It was a trade that saw the exchange of two future Hall of Famers.

In 5 seasons with the Orioles, Wilhelm was a combined 43-39 with a 2.42 ERA.

In 5 seasons with the Orioles, Wilhelm was a combined 43-39 with a 2.42 ERA.

On January 14, 1963, the Baltimore Orioles acquired All-Star shortstop Luis Aparcio and outfielder Al Smith from the Chicago White Sox for four players, including reliever Hoyt Wilhelm,

The White Sox also received shortstop and 1960 Rookie of the Year Ron Hansen, outfielder Dave Nicholson and infielder Pete Ward as part of the deal. Ward would have an outstanding years for the White Sox, hitting 22 home runs and driving in 84 runs to win the Rookie of the Year award for the 1963 season.

Aparicio played for five seasons with the Orioles, batting .251 and stealing 166 bases. He won two more Gold Gloves with the Orioles, and claimed nine Gold Gloves during his 18-year career. In 1967, he was traded back to the White Sox in the deal that brought Don Buford to the Orioles.

Aparicio played for 5 seasons with the Orioles, batting .251 and stealing 166 bases.

Aparicio played for 5 seasons with the Orioles, batting .251 and stealing 166 bases.

In five seasons with the Orioles, Wilhelm was a combined 43-39 with a 2.42 ERA. He appeared in 185 games – 43 as a starter – saving 40 games while pitching five shutouts, the only shutouts of his career. He also pitched his only no-hitter with the Orioles, and led the American League with a 2.19 ERA in 1959, when he recorded a career-high 15 victories. Wilhelm would spend six seasons with the White Sox, appearing in 361 games and saving 98 with a combined 1.92 ERA.

Both Aparicio and Wilhelm were destined for future Hall of Fame induction. Speed and defense made Aparicio the American League’ premier shortstop from the mid-1950s to the mid-1960s. An 11-time All-Star, he collected 2,677 hits (more than any shortstop until he was passed by Derek Jeter). Aparicio played more games at shortstop than any other player in major league history (2,581). He was elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1984.

Throughout the 1960s, no relief pitcher was as consistently effective as Wilhelm. His 1,070 career appearances were the major league record at the time Wilhelm called it quits. He remains the all-time major league leader in career wins in relief (124) and career innings pitched in relief (1,871).

An eight-time All-Star, Wilhelm was elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1985.