Warren and Christy … Together at Last

 

This Week in 1960s Baseball

(September 8, 1963) Pitching a nine-hit complete game, Warren Spahn raised his season record to 20-5 as the Milwaukee Braves beat the Philadelphia Phillies 3-2 at Connie Mack Stadium in Philadelphia.

It was the thirteenth time in his career that Spahn won 20 or more games. That tied him with Christy Mathewson for the most 20-vistory seasons in the major leagues.

The 1963 season was the thirteenth 20-victory season in the career of Warren Spahn. It was the seventh straight season when Spahn led the National League in complete games.

The 1963 season was the thirteenth 20-victory season in the career of Warren Spahn. It was the seventh straight season when Spahn led the National League in complete games.

For the 42-year-old Spahn, it was his nineteenth complete game of the 1963 season. He would finish the season with 22 complete games, the most in the majors. Spahn recorded no strikeouts or walks during the game.

The Braves scored in the first inning when lead-off batter Lee Maye singled and advanced to second on an error by Phillies starter Dallas Green. Frank Bolling sacrificed Maye to third, and Maye scored on Hank Aaron’s groundout to Phillies second baseman Tony Taylor. It was Aaron’s 117th RBI of the season.

The Braves’ lead held up as Spahn pitched a shutout through six innings. Tony Gonzalez led off the bottom of the seventh inning with a triple and scored on a Roy Sievers sacrifice fly.

In the eighth inning, Green walked Eddie Mathews, who scored on Gene Oliver’s sixteenth home run. Spahn pitched a scoreless eighth inning and allowed a solo home run by Don Demeter in the ninth. Don Hoak doubled to put the potential tying run in scoring position, but Spahn retired Bob Oldis and Wes Covington to end the game.

The losing pitcher was Green (5-4).

Shown in an undated photo is Christy Christy Mathewson was the first major league pitcher to win 20 or more games 13 times. (Warren Spahn was the second.) Mathewson finished his career with 373 victories, third most in major league history (tied with Grover Cleveland Alexander) and 10 more than Spahn.

Christy Mathewson was the first major league pitcher to win 20 or more games 13 times. (Warren Spahn was the second.) Mathewson finished his career with 373 victories, third most in major league history (tied with Grover Cleveland Alexander) and 10 more than Spahn.

Spahn’s 1963 season was one of the best of his career, as he finished the season at 23-7 with a 2.60 earned run average. It was also his seventh straight season leading the National League in complete games, and he pitched seven shutouts, tying his season high and the second most in the league (behind 11 Sandy Koufax shutouts).

Though he tied Mathewson for most 20-win seasons, Spahn fell short of matching Mathewson’s 373 career wins. Spahn retired after the 1965 season with 363 victories, the most by any left-hander in baseball history.

The Power in Polo

 

Homer Happy: Frank Thomas

From their inaugural season of 1962 until 1975, the New York Mets’ single-season record for home runs belonged to a right-handed hitting outfielder who played for the Mets for only two seasons, but was a National League power threat for a decade.

With 34 home runs in 1962 – the Mets’ first year of existence – Frank Thomas held the franchise’s single-season home run record until 1975.

With 34 home runs in 1962 – the Mets’ first year of existence – Frank Thomas held the franchise’s single-season home run record until 1975.

Slugger Frank Thomas played both the outfield and first base for seven different teams in 16 years. Over that long career, he batted .266 with 286 home runs and 962 RBIs.

Thomas signed with the Pittsburgh Pirates in 1947 and made his major league debut in 1951. In 1953, his first full major league season, Thomas batted .255 for the Pirates with 30 home runs and 102 RBIs. He was an All-Star three times in his five full seasons with Pittsburgh, and had his best season in 1958 with 35 home runs and 109 RBIs.

In 1959, Thomas was traded to the Cincinnati Reds in the deal that brought Smoky Burgess, Harvey Haddix and Don Hoak to the Pirates. Thomas spent one season in Cincinnati (12 home runs, 47 RBIs) and then was traded to the Chicago Cubs. With the Cubs, he hit 21 home runs with 64 RBIs in 1960, and a month into the 1961 season he was traded to the Milwaukee Braves. He had a solid season for the Braves, hitting 25 home runs plus two with the Cubs. The Braves team of 1961 was loaded with power hitters, and was the first major league club to smash four consecutive home runs in a game. (Thomas hit the fourth, preceded by home runs from the bats of Eddie Mathews, Hank Aaron, and Joe Adcock.)

Frank Thomas broke into the big leagues in a big way. In 1953, his first full season with the Pittsburgh Pirates, Thomas hit 30 home runs with 102 RBIs.

Frank Thomas broke into the big leagues in a big way. In 1953, his first full season with the Pittsburgh Pirates, Thomas hit 30 home runs with 102 RBIs.

After the 1961 season, he was traded to the Mets for outfielder Gus Bell. He led that first Mets team with 34 home runs and 94 RBIs. His home run mark was not topped by another Mets hitter until Dave Kingman blasted 36 in 1975.

Thomas hit 15 home runs for the Mets in 1963 and was traded to the Philadelphia Phillies in 1964. At this point in his career, the 35-year-old Thomas had become a part-time player and pinch hitter, batting .282 in two seasons with the Phillies. He retired in 1966 with 1,671 career hits.

12/13 Perfect, and Pretty Solid Otherwise

 

Glancing Back, and Remembering Harvey Haddix

Left-hander Harvey Haddix will always be remembered best as the pitcher who carried a perfect game into the thirteenth inning in a May 25, 1959 game against the Milwaukee Braves … a game Haddix eventually lost 1-0. Surrounding that game was a solid 14-year career as a starter and reliever for five different teams.

As a rookie for the St. Louis Cardinals in 1953, Harvey Haddix was 20-9 and led the National League with six shutouts.

As a rookie for the St. Louis Cardinals in 1953, Harvey Haddix was 20-9 and led the National League with six shutouts.

Haddix was signed by the St. Louis Cardinals in 1947 and made seven appearances with the big league club in 1952. In 1953, the 27-year-old rookie went 20-9 for the Cardinals. His 3.06 ERA that season was fourth best in the National League, and his six shutouts led the league. He followed up in 1954 with an 18-13 record (3.57 ERA), and then slipped to 12-16 in 1955.

In May of 1956 the Cardinals sent Haddix to the Philadelphia Phillies in a four-player deal. He was 22-21 in two seasons with Philadelphia, and then was traded to the Cincinnati Reds (for outfielder Wally Post) where he posted an 8-7 record in 1958.

Prior to the 1959 season, Haddix was traded with Smoky Burgess and Don Hoak to the Pittsburgh Pirates for Whammy Douglas, Jim Pendleton, John Powers and Frank Thomas. All three players going to Pittsburgh would play major roles in the Pirates’ pennant-winning season of 1960.

Haddix went 12-12 for the Pirates in 1959, including his near-perfect game, which was one of the losses. In 1960, Haddix was 11-10 with a 3.97 ERA. He was the winning pitcher in two games of the 1960 World Series, including the epic seventh game won by the Pirates over the New York Yankees 10-9 on Bill Mazeroski’s walk-off home run in the bottom of the ninth.

Harvey Haddix pitched 12 perfect innings in a 1959 game against the Milwaukee Braves … only to lose 1-0 in the thirteenth inning.

Harvey Haddix pitched 12 perfect innings in a 1959 game against the Milwaukee Braves … only to lose 1-0 in the thirteenth inning.

Haddix pitched three more seasons for the Pirates, going 22-16 with a 3.99 ERA. During that period, he made the transition from starting pitcher to reliever. He was acquired by the Baltimore Orioles following the 1963 season, and in the next two seasons made 73 appearances for the Orioles, all in relief, going 8-7 with 11 saves and a combined ERA of 2.63. He retired after the 1965 season with a career record of 136-113 and a lifetime ERA of 3.63.

A three-time All-Star, Haddix was one of the best defensive pitchers of his era. He won three consecutive Gold Gloves, from 1958 to 1960.

 

 

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Buc in the Hot Corner

 

Glancing Back, and Remembering Don Hoak

Don Hoak was nicknamed “Tiger” partly because of his pre-baseball athletic career as a boxer, and partly because of his tough, aggressive style of play as a major leaguer. He played 11 seasons with five different National League teams, but his best seasons came as the third baseman for the Pittsburgh Pirates from 1959 through 1962.

Don Hoak finished second to teammate <a rel=

Hoak was originally signed by the Brooklyn Dodgers in 1947 and worked his way through the Dodgers’ farm system to make his debut with the team in 1954. After two seasons as a part-time player with the Dodgers, he was traded with Russ Meyer and Walt Moryn to the Chicago Cubs for Don Elston and Randy Jackson. He hit .215 in his only season with the Cubs, and was dealt to the Cincinnati Reds.

The 1957 season was his break-out year, hitting .293 for Cincinnati with 19 home runs and 89 RBIs. He also led the major leagues with 39 doubles, and was the starting third baseman in the 1957 All-Star game.

Hoak hit .261 for the Reds in 1958, and was traded with Smoky Burgess and Harvey Haddix to the Pittsburgh Pirates for Whammy Douglas, Jim Pendleton, John Powers and Frank Thomas. Hoak was inserted at third for the Bucs and hit .294 in 1959 with eight home runs and 65 RBIs. He led the league in games played with 155.

Don Hoak was an All-Star for the Cincinnati Reds in 1957.

Don Hoak was an All-Star for the Cincinnati Reds in 1957.

During the Pirates’ pennant-winning season of 1960, Hoak had his best all-around season, hitting .282 with 16 home runs and 79 RBIs, while providing solid third-base play for Pittsburgh. He had two doubles and three RBIs in the 1960 World Series. Hoak finished second to teammate Dick Groat for the Most Valuable Player award that season.

Hoak hit for a career-high average of .298 in 1961, but his batting average slipped to .241 in 1962 and he was traded in the off-season to the Philadelphia Phillies. He hit .231 for the Phillies in 1963, and was released by Philadelphia six games into the 1964 season.

Hoak finished his career with 1,144 hits and a .265 batting average.

 

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Speed Ain’t Everything

Glancing Back, and Remembering Smoky Burgess

Smoky Burgess was one of the best hitting catchers in the history of baseball. He retired as one of the most prolific pinch hitters in the history of the game.

At the end of his career with the Chicago White Sox, Smoky Burgess was one of the game’s most lethal pinch hitters. He batted .318 with 15 RBIs as a pinch hitter in 1966.

Smoky Burgess finished with a career batting average of .295, and he did it with a quick bat rather than quick legs. He had a career slugging percentage of .446 and stole only 13 bases in 18 major league seasons.

Burgess was signed by the Chicago Cubs in 1944 and made his debut with the team in 1949. He was traded to the Cincinnati Reds in October of 1951, and two months later was traded to the Philadelphia Phillies. He hit .296 in his first full season with the Phillies, and then batted .292 in 1953 and .368 in 1954.

At the start of the 1955 season, Burgess was traded back to the Reds. As the Reds’ starting catcher, Burgess had one of his best all-around offensive campaigns in 1955, batting .301 with 21 home runs and 78 RBIs. He hit for a combined batting average of .280 over the next three seasons, though he would never again match the power numbers he put up in 1955.

Just prior to the 1959 season, Burgess was traded again by the Reds with Harvey Haddix and Don Hoak to the Pittsburgh Pirates for Whammy Douglas, Jim Pendleton, John Powers and Frank Thomas. It was a deal that would be critical to the Pirates’ success in 1960, as all three players acquired from the Reds contributed significantly in helping Pittsburgh win its first National League pennant in 44 years. Burgess hit .297 for the Pirates in 1959 and .294 in 1960. His best season in Pittsburgh was 1962, when he hit .328 with 13 home runs and 61 RBIs.

At the end of his career with the Chicago White Sox, Smoky Burgess was one of the game’s most lethal pinch hitters. He batted .318 with 15 RBIs as a pinch hitter in 1966.

At the end of his career with the Chicago White Sox, Smoky Burgess was one of the game’s most lethal pinch hitters. He batted .318 with 15 RBIs as a pinch hitter in 1966.

In 1964, Burgess was acquired by the Chicago White Sox. While he served as a backup catcher for the White Sox, he was primarily a pinch hitter in his last three seasons, and was one of that era’s best. He hit a game-tying pinch home run in his first plate appearance for the White Sox, and hit .286 in 1965 and .313 in 1966. He retired after the 1967 season with a career batting average of .295.

Though never considered one of the game’s elite defensive catchers, Burgess did lead National League catchers in fielding percentage three times. He was a six-time All-Star.

 

 

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