Chief of Relief

 

Oh, What a Relief: Ed Roebuck

For 11 major league seasons, Ed Roebuck was a stellar relief pitcher for three different teams. In 460 big league appearances, he made only one start (in 1957).

A mainstay in the Dodgers’ bullpen in the early 1960s, Ed Roebuck was 10-2 with nine saves in 1962.

A mainstay in the Dodgers’ bullpen in the early 1960s, Ed Roebuck was 10-2 with nine saves in 1962.

Roebuck was signed by the Brooklyn Dodgers in 1949. He spent six years in the Dodgers’ farm system, finding moderate success as a reliever before pitching as a starter and reliever at the AAA level, winning 15 games in 1953 and 18 games in 1954.

When Roebuck was promoted to the Dodgers’ pitching staff in 1955, he began his major league career in relief, going 5-6 with a 4.61 ERA. He appeared in 47 games for the Dodgers, finishing 27 with 12 saves (second in the National League). He pitched in the sixth game of the 1955 World Series, tossing two innings of scoreless, one-hit relief. He was 8-2 with a 2.71 ERA in 1957, and was 0-1 with a 3.48 ERA and five saves in 1958.

In 1959, Roebuck was sent back to the minors, where he pitched exclusively as a starter at St. Paul in the American Association. He went 13-10 with a 2.98 ERA in 28 starts. Then he found himself back on the Dodgers’ roster in 1960, going 8-3 with a 2.78 ERA in 58 appearances … all in relief. He made only five appearances in 1961, but teamed with left-hander Ron Perranoski to form one of the most effective relief tandems in baseball in 1962. As the right-handed half of that pair, Roebuck appeared in 64 games with a 10-2 record and a 3.09 ERA. He finished 22 games and saved nine. Together, Roebuck and Perranoski combined for a 16-8 record with 29 saves.

In 1963, Roebuck opened the season with the Dodgers but was traded at the end of July to the Washington Senators for Marv Breeding. Roebuck was a combined 4-5 with four saves and a 3.69 ERA for 1963.

Ed Roebuck was 5-3 with a 2.21 ERA and 12 saves for the Philadelphia Phillies in 1964.

Ed Roebuck was 5-3 with a 2.21 ERA and 12 saves for the Philadelphia Phillies in 1964.

In April of 1964 Roebuck was purchased by the Philadelphia Phillies and went 5-3 with a 2.21 ERA and 12 saves for the Phillies. He was 5-3 with three saves in 1965, and appeared in six games in 1966 before being released by Philadelphia. He caught on with San Diego in the Pacific Coast League for a season and a half before retiring as a player after the 1967 season.

Roebuck finished his major league career at 52-31 for a .627 winning percentage. His career ERA was 3.35 with 62 saves.

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Pep at First

 

The Glove Club: Joe Pepitone

When the New York Yankees were looking to bolster their starting rotation following the 1962 season, they considered Bill Skowron expendable because of a first sacker they had waiting in the wings: Joe Pepitone. By trading Skowron to the Los Angeles Dodgers for starting pitcher Stan Williams, the Yankees opened the door to the left-handed hitting Pepitone, who brought a better first-base glove to the Yankee infield while expected to provide the same level of run production that the Yankees had gotten from “Moose” Skowron the previous five seasons.

As the New York Yankees’ first baseman for most of the 1960s, Joe Pepitone won three Gold Gloves.

As the New York Yankees’ first baseman for most of the 1960s, Joe Pepitone won three Gold Gloves.

Pepitone was signed by the Yankees in 1958 and made his debut in New York 4 seasons later, hitting .239 in 63 games. In 1963, he inherited Skowron’s first base position on a full-time basis, and responded by batting .271 with 27 home runs and 89 RBIs. In 1964, Pepitone’s batting average slipped to .251, but his power numbers increased to 28 home runs and 100 RBIs.

The 1964 season also was the one when Pepitone emerged as one of the American League’s premier first basemen. He led the league in putouts, assists and double plays at first base. He won the Gold Glove in 1965, 1966 and 1969. A versatile athlete, Pepitone moved to the Yankees’ outfield as needed, and played more games in the outfield than at first base in 1967 and 1968.

From 1963 through 1969, Pepitone averaged 23 home runs and 75 RBIs per season.But his decline in run productivity coincided with the Yankees’ decline in the standings. After hitting a career-best 31 home runs in 1966, he hit only 28 home runs combined over the next two seasons. His bat revived in 1969, as Pepitone returned to first place full time, hitting 27 home runs and winning hit third Gold Glove.

Joe Pepitone averaged 23 home runs and 75 RBIs for the Yankees from 1963-1969. His best season as a Yankee came in 1964, when he hit 28 home runs with 100 RBIs and led American League first basemen in putouts, assists and double plays.

Joe Pepitone averaged 23 home runs and 75 RBIs for the Yankees from 1963-1969. His best season as a Yankee came in 1964, when he hit 28 home runs with 100 RBIs and led American League first basemen in putouts, assists and double plays.

Following the 1969 season, the Yankees traded Pepitone to the Houston Astros for outfielder Curt Blefary. He hit .251 in 75 games for Houston before being purchased by the Chicago Cubs, where he replaced Ernie Banks at first base. His combined batting numbers for 1970 included 26 home runs and 79 RBIs.

Pepitone played three more seasons in Chicago. He hit .307 for the Cubs in 1971 with 16 home runs and 61 RBIs. In 1973 he was traded to the Atlanta Braves for Andre Thornton, but played in only three games for the Braves before retiring at age 32.

Pepitone finished with a career batting average of .258. He had 1,315 hits and 219 home runs. He was a member of the All-Star team three times.

Left Side Savvy

 

Glancing Back, and Remembering George Brunet

George Brunet was a journeyman southpaw who finally got his chance to start regularly with the California Angels in the mid-1960s. He was a consistently effective pitcher for struggling Angels teams, and his record as a starter for California reflected his team’s struggles more than his own abilities.

A low ERA didn’t translate into victories for George Brunet. Pitching for the California Angels from 1965-1968, Brunet was 46-60 with a combined 3.03 ERA.

A low ERA didn’t translate into victories for George Brunet. Pitching for the California Angels from 1965-1968, Brunet was 46-60 with a combined 3.03 ERA. Brunet led the American League with 17 losses in 1968 – despite a 2.86 ERA.

Prior to the 1955 season, Brunet was acquired by the Kansas City Athletics from Seminole in the Sooner State League. He made his major league debut with the A’s in 1956, appearing in only 10 games over the next two seasons. He was traded to the Milwaukee Braves in 1960, winning both decisions in only 17 appearances. He pitched in only 22 games for the Braves over two seasons, and then was dealt to the Houston Colt .45s, where he was 2-4 with a 4.50 ERA in 17 games, including 11 starts. In 1963 he moved from Houston to the Baltimore Orioles, where he was 0-1 in 16 relief appearances. From 1956 to 1963, playing for four different major league teams, Brunet had compiled a record of 4-11 in only 73 appearances.

His break came in 1964 when he was purchased by the Los Angeles Angels and was put into the Angels’ starting rotation, going 2-2 with a 3.61 ERA over the last six weeks of the 1964 season. He made 26 starts for the Angels in 1965, going 9-11 with a 2.56 ERA and three shutouts. He was 13-13 in 1966 with a 3.31 ERA, pitching eight complete games with a pair of shutouts.

When Dean Chance was traded to the Minnesota Twins prior to the 1967 season, Brunet took over as the team’s workhorse, pitching 250 innings in 37 starts. His record was 11-19, leading the American League in losses in 1967 despite a respectable 3.31 ERA. He followed in 1968 with a 13-17 record on a 2.86 ERA, with eight complete games and five shutouts.

During the 1969 season, Brunet’s contract was purchased by the Seattle Pilots, and he compiled a combined record of 8-12 with a 4.44 ERA. He split the 1970 season between the Washington Senators and the Pittsburgh Pirates, going 9-7 with a 4.21 ERA. In January of 1971, he was traded with Matty Alou to the St. Louis Cardinals for Nelson Briles and Vic Davalillo. He was released by St. Louis after seven appearances, and retired.

Brunet finished his 15-year career with a 69-93 rhttps://baseball1960s.leadpages.co/top-10-pitchers-chance/ecord and a 3.62 ERA.

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No Compromise

 

Glancing Back, and Remembering Andy Messersmith

Andy Messersmith will always be remembered primarily for his role in helping bring down baseball’s “reserve clause” that effectively bound a player to a particular team for life … or until the team decided to trade or release him. When Messersmith took the Los Angeles Dodgers to arbitration and won free agent status, it created the free agent opportunity that every major league player can enjoy today. It culminated in the final dismantling of teams’ stranglehold on players, a dismantling that began with Curt Flood in 1969.

Andy Messersmith won 130 games in the major leagues. He was also the first player to test the reserve clause successfully and win the right to negotiate as a free agent.

Andy Messersmith won 130 games in the major leagues. He was also the first player to test the reserve clause successfully and win the right to negotiate as a free agent.

Part of the reason that Messersmith’s case was so high profile was that, as a starting pitcher, Messersmith himself was high profile. He was one of the best right-handers of his generation, and at his best was one of the game’s most dominant pitchers.

Messersmith was selected by the California Angels with the twelfth overall pick in the 1966 amateur draft. The hard-throwing Messersmith was pitching out of the Angels’ bullpen four years later, and was a member of the team’s starting rotation by 1969, when he went 16-11 and posted a 2.52 ERA. He went 11-10 in 1970, and won 20 games for the Angels in 1972, with four shutouts and 14 complete games in 38 starts.

Messersmith slipped to 8-11 in 1973, and was traded with Ken McMullen to the Los Angeles Dodgers for Billy Grabarkewitz, Frank Robinson, Bill Singer, Mike Strahler and Bobby Valentine. He went 14-10 in his first season with the Dodgers, and followed that with a 20-6 season in 1974, posting a 2.59 ERA.

Messersmith had requested a no-trade clause be included in his 1975 contract, which the Dodgers refused. Messersmith in turn refused to sign a new contract, and played the 1975 season without a contract under the reserve clause. He went 19-14 with a 2.29 ERA. He led the National League in games started (40), innings pitched (321.2), complete games (19) and shutouts (7). He also won his second consecutive Gold Glove that season.

Messersmith was granted his free agency and signed with the Atlanta Braves. But he was never the same pitcher again. He was 11-11 with the Braves in 1976, and went 7-11 over the next three seasons with the Braves, the New York Yankees and the Dodgers. He retired after being released by the Dodgers in 1979.

Messersmith was an All-Star four times during his 12-year career. His career record was 130-99 with a 2.86 ERA. He had 27 shutouts in 295 starts.

 

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O’s Ace

 

Glancing Back, and Remembering Jim Palmer

Jim Palmer’s Hall of Fame career – 19 seasons, all in a Baltimore Orioles uniform – got its start in the 1960s, and nearly ended there. While showing flashes of brilliance in his early major league career – including being the youngest pitcher to throw a World Series shutout – assorted back and arm problems nearly ended his career before he could establish himself as one of the game’s most durable and consistent starters during the 1970s.

At age 20, Jim Palmer became the youngest pitcher to throw a World Series shutout, blanking the Los Angeles Dodgers 6-0 in 1966.

At age 20, Jim Palmer became the youngest pitcher to throw a World Series shutout, blanking the Los Angeles Dodgers 6-0 in 1966.

Palmer was signed by the Orioles in 1963 at age 17 and made his debut with the Orioles two years later, going 5-4 with a 3.72 ERA in 27 appearances – all but six in relief. He moved into the Orioles’ starting rotation in 1966, going 15-10 with a 3.46 ERA. He pitched the game that clinched the American League pennant for the Orioles, and pitched the second game of the 1966 World Series, shutting out the Dodgers 6-0 and beating Sandy Koufax (in what would turn out to be his final major league appearance).

Arm miseries plagued Palmer over the next two seasons. He pitched only nine innings in 1967 and spent the entire 1968 season in minor league rehab, during which time Palmer reworked his pitching mechanics. He re-emerged in 1969 showing signs of the pitcher he would become: going 16-4 with a 2.34 ERA and six shutouts. He also pitched a no-hitter against the Oakland A’s.

During the 1970s Palmer hit his stride, a stride that would carry him to Cooperstown. He won 20 or more games in eight of the next nine seasons. He led the American League in ERA in 1973 (2.40) and in 1975 (2.09), when he led the majors in wins (23) and shutouts (10).

After struggling with injuries and control, Jim Palmer emerged as a dominant pitcher in 1969, going 16-4 with a 2.34 ERA. He would be a 20-game winner eight times during the 1970s.

After struggling with injuries and control, Jim Palmer emerged as a dominant pitcher in 1969, going 16-4 with a 2.34 ERA. He would be a 20-game winner eight times during the 1970s.

Palmer retired after being released by the Orioles in 1984 with a record of 268-152 and a career ERA of 2.86. He was an All-Star six times, and was the first American League pitcher to win three Cy Young Awards. During his entire major league career, he never gave up a grand slam home run, or even back-to-back home runs.

Palmer remains the Orioles’ all-time career leader in games pitched, innings pitched, games started, wins, shutouts and strikeouts. He was elected to the Hall of Fame in 1990, his first year of eligibility.

 

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Best Day of the Weak

 

Glancing Back, and Remembering Rick Monday

Coming up with the American League’s perennial also-rans in Kansas City, Rick Monday quickly established himself as one of the best players in the Athletics’ line-up and one of the best all-around players in the league.

As a rookie with the Kansas City Athletics in 1967, Rick Monday batted .251 with 14 home runs and 58 RBIs.

As a rookie with the Kansas City Athletics in 1967, Rick Monday batted .251 with 14 home runs and 58 RBIs.

A native of Arkansas, Monday starred for the Arizona State Sun Devils, leading the team to the 1965 NCAA championship (while playing with future teammate and Hall of Famer Reggie Jackson). Monday was the first overall selection in the inaugural Major League First-Year Player Draft in 1965, taken by the Kansas City Athletics. He appeared in 17 games for the A’s at the end of the 1966 season, and then batted .251 with 14 home runs and 54 RBIs in his 1967 rookie campaign.

Monday was an All-Star in 1968, when he hit .274 for the now Oakland Athletics. He batted .271 in 1969, .290 in 1970 and slipped to .245 in 1971. In November of 1971, the A’s dealt Monday to the Chicago Cubs for pitcher Ken Holtzman, and Monday was to become a mainstay in the Cubs’ outfield for the next five seasons, hitting a combined .270. His best season in Chicago was 1976, when he hit .272 and had career bests in home runs (32) and RBIs (77).

In 1977 Monday was traded with Mike Garman to the Los Angeles Dodgers for Jeff Albert (minors), Bill Buckner and Ivan De Jesus. He spent his last eight major league seasons with the Dodgers, hitting a combined .254 and providing the team’s best center field play since the departure of Willie Davis.

Rick Monday’s best season came with the Chicago Cubs in 1976. He hit 32 home runs, drove in 77 runs and scored 107 runs – all career highs.

Rick Monday’s best season came with the Chicago Cubs in 1976. He hit 32 home runs, drove in 77 runs and scored 107 runs – all career highs.

After so many years of consistently performing well for second-division teams, Monday finally tasted World Series success as a member of the Dodgers in 1981. He was primarily a utility player when he hit the deciding home run in the National League Championship Series. Monday drilled a two-out, ninth-inning homer that proved to be the difference in a 2-1 victory over the Montreal Expos, a victory that elevated the Dodgers to the World Series where they dispatched the New York Yankees in six games.

Monday lasted for 19 big league seasons, hitting a combined .264 with 1,619 hits over his career. He was twice an All-Star, once in each league.

Gritty Lefty

 

Glancing Back, and Remembering Johnny Podres

Johnny Podres was a vital member of the Dodgers’ starting rotation for a decade, with a “coast to coast” Dodger career that started in Brooklyn and moved with the team to LA. He was at his best in clutch situations, a battler you could count on to give his best in the game you had to have.

Johnny Podres was 148-116 in 15 major league seasons, 13 with the Dodgers. He was an All-Star three times.

Johnny Podres was 148-116 in 15 major league seasons, 13 with the Dodgers. He was an All-Star three times.

Podres was signed by the Dodgers in 1951 and made his major league debut at age 20 in 1953, going 9-4 for the Dodgers with a 4.23 ERA. He moved into the starting rotation midway into the 1954 season, going 11-7 and following in 1955 with a 9-10 season. He started and won two games in the 1955 World Series, including a 2-0 shutout of the New York Yankees in the deciding seventh game.

After a year in military service, Podres returned in 1957 to go 12-9 while leading the National League with a 2.66 ERA. He also led the major leagues with six shutouts. He went 13-15 in 1958 and 14-9 in 1959, with another World Series victory that year.

His best season with the Dodgers came in 1961, when he posted an 18-5 record with a 3.74 ERA. His .783 winning percentage was the highest in the National League. He went 14-12 for the Dodgers in their pennant-winning 1963 season, winning the second game of the 1963 World Series against the Yankees.

Johnny Podres’ best season came in 1961, when he was 18-5 record with a 3.74 ERA. His .783 winning percentage was the highest in the National League.

Johnny Podres’ best season came in 1961, when he was 18-5 record with a 3.74 ERA. His .783 winning percentage was the highest in the National League.

In 13 seasons with the Dodgers, Podres compiled a 136-104 record with a 3.66 ERA. In 1966, he was traded to the Detroit Tigers, and went 7-6 as a spot starter and reliever over the next two seasons. He was released by the Tigers following the 1967 season, and after one year out of baseball, returned to pitch for the San Diego Padres in 1969, going 5-6 with a 4.31 ERA. He retired after the 1969 season.

In 15 major league season, Podres compiled a 148-116 record with a 3.68 career ERA. He pitched 24 shutouts and was an All-Star three times.

 

 

 

 

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Dodgers Go Power Hunting … and Bag a Moose

 

This Week in 1960s Baseball

(November 26, 1962) The Los Angeles Dodgers, looking to boost their run-scoring, today announced the acquisition of New York Yankee first baseman Bill Skowron in a trade for starting pitcher Stan Williams.

To improve their run scoring in 1963, the Los Angeles Dodgers acquired slugging first baseman Bill “Moose” Skowron from the New York Yankees. Skowron struggled during the regular season, but batted .385 against the Yankees during the 1963 World Series.

To improve their run scoring in 1963, the Los Angeles Dodgers acquired slugging first baseman Bill “Moose” Skowron from the New York Yankees. Skowron struggled during the regular season, but batted .385 against the Yankees during the 1963 World Series.

“Moose” Skowron, 31, hit .270 for the World Series champion Yankees in 1962, with 23 home runs and 80 RBIs. In nine seasons with the Yankees, Skowron batted .294 while averaging 18 home runs with 75 RBIs per season. His best season with the Yankees was 1960, when he hit .309 with 26 home runs and 91 RBIs.

Williams, 25, went 14-12 for the Dodgers in 1962. From 1960 through 1962, the hard-throwing right-hander won 43 games for the Dodgers, but his ERA increased each year, from 3.00 in 1960 to 3.90 in 1961 to 4.46 in 1962. His strikeouts per nine innings decreased from 7.6 in 1960 to 5.6 in 1962.

In acquiring Skowron, the Dodgers were looking for more offense to keep pace with their West Coast rivals, the National League champion San Francisco Giants. The Dodgers finished second to the Giants in 1962, losing two out of three league playoff games that were needed when both teams finished the regular season tied for first place.

The Dodgers already had the National League RBI leader in Tommy Davis (with a franchise record 153 RBIs in 1962). Davis was also the National League batting champion in 1962 (.346), an accomplishment he would repeat in 1963 (hitting .326). Skowron’s bat was expected to produce more runs while protecting Davis in the batting order.

To acquire Skowron, the Dodgers gave up pitcher <a rel=

The trade turned out better for the Dodgers than it did for the Yankees, but only slightly. Williams went 9-8 for the Yankees in 1963 and 1-5 the following year. Skowron struggled against National League pitching. He appeared in only 89 games for the Dodgers, hitting .203 with four home runs and 19 RBIs. Skowron’s only saving performance for the Dodgers came in the 1963 World Series, where he hit .385 against his former team, including a three-run homer in Game Two.

The Year He Was Everything But MVP.

 

Career Year: Tommy Davis (1962)

In his 1962 break-out season, outfielder Tommy Davis did everything he needed to do to claim the National League’s Most Valuable Player award.

Everything, that is, except to actually win it.

Here’s how it happened.That season’s MVP went to teammate Maury Wills. Looking back a half-century, and looking at the numbers for both players, it’s hard to justify how Davis got passed over.

Tommy Davis - Los Angeles Dodgers outfielder won the National League batting title in 1962 and 1963

Tommy Davis – Los Angeles Dodgers outfielder won the National League batting title in 1962 and 1963

Tommy Davis was signed by the Brooklyn Dodgers in 1956. He never batted below .300 in 4 minor league seasons. In 1959, with Spokane in the Pacific Coast League, Davis batted .345 with 18 home runs and 78 RBIs. He made his major league debut with the Los Angeles Dodgers at the end of the 1959 season, striking out in his only plate appearance.

Davis opened the 1960 season on the Dodgers’ roster, and gradually took over full-time duties in center field from Duke Snider and Don Demeter. He finished the 1960 season batting .276 with 11 home runs and 44 runs batted in. In 1961, Davis batted .278 with 15 home runs and 58 RBIs. He played 86 games in the outfield, at all three positions, and played 59 games at third base. He was, essentially, a utility player for the Dodgers.

That would change in 1962. He opened the season as the team’s everyday left fielder, and was hitting .316 at the end of April. In May he batted .336 with five home runs and 25 RBIs, and in June Davis batted .354 with three home runs and 32 RBIs. By the All-Star break, Davis was batting .353 with 15 doubles, 15 home runs and 90 RBIs. He made his first All-Star appearance that season.

While Davis was leading the National League in hits, runs batted in and batting average, he wasn’t getting national media attention for his monster season. During the first half of the season, the media reserved their Dodger focus on a pair of pitchers – Don Drysdale and Sandy Koufax – who were having outstanding seasons in leading the Dodgers to the top of the National League standings. At the All-Star break in 1962, Drysdale was 15-4 with a 2.88 ERA. Koufax, an 18-game winner in 1961, was 13-4 with a 2.15 ERA and led the major leagues with 202 strikeouts. Drysdale would go on to win the Cy Young award with a 25-9 record, while an arm injury would limit Koufax to only one more victory over the rest of the 1962 campaign.

The other media “distraction” from Davis’ season was a record-breaking performance by Dodger shortstop Maury Wills. By late July, it became obvious that Wills was on his way to breaking the single season record for stolen bases held by Ty Cobb. It would be the second consecutive year when a hallowed baseball record was under assault, as only a year before there was a media frenzy following Roger Maris’ (and Mickey Mantle’s) chase of Babe Ruth’s record for home runs in a single season.

Tommy Davis led the NL with 230 hits in 1962, the most in 25 years.

Wills eventually caught Cobb’s record of 96 stolen bases and finished the season with 104, a season which the Dodgers and the San Francisco Giants finished in a dead heat, requiring a three-game playoff which the Giants won. It was an exciting season on many fronts.

And Tommy Davis? Lost in the shuffle of a heated pennant race and outstanding individual performances, Davis led the National League with 230 hits (32 ahead of Wills and Frank Robinson), 153 RBIs (12 ahead of Willie Mays) and a .346 batting average. He also finished fourth in the league in doubles and total bases, fifth in triples and slugging (.535 percentage), and seventh in stolen bases.

In the MVP voting, Davis finished third behind Wills and Mays. Stolen bases and triples were the only offensive categories in which Wills was the league leader.

It would be the best season of Tommy Davis’ career. He would lead the National League in hitting again in 1963 with a .326 average, but his power numbers would drop to 16 home runs (compared to 27 in 1962) and 88 RBIs, down 65 from the previous season. He would suffer a broken ankle during the 1965 season that would compromise his speed for the rest of his career, though Davis would remain a steady hitter throughout his 18-year career, retiring after the 1976 season with a .294 career batting average.

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Sandy Secures Second Cy

 

This Week in 1960s Baseball

(November 3, 1965) In a unanimous vote, Los Angeles Dodgers southpaw Sandy Koufax (26-8, 2.04, 382 strikeouts) today was named the Cy Young Award winner.

Sandy  Koufax was the first pitcher to win a second Cy  Young Award.

Sandy Koufax was the first pitcher to win a second Cy Young Award.

It was Koufax’s second Cy Young Award in the past three years. He became the first pitcher to win the honor more than once.

Koufax won the pitching “Triple Crown” by leading the major leagues in wins, ERA and strikeouts. He also led the majors in winning percentage (.765), complete games (27) and innings pitched (335.2). The National League’s Most Valuable player in 1963, Koufax finished second to Willie Mays in the MVP balloting for 1965.

On September 9, 1965, Koufax pitched his fourth career no-hitter, a 1-0 perfect game against the Chicago Cubs.

In the 1965 World Series, Koufax was 2-1 against the Minnesota Twins with a 0.38 ERA. He struck out 29 Twins batters in 24 innings pitched.

 

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