Is Don’s Record in Danger?

 

This Week in 1960s Baseball

(June 26, 1968) On June 4, 1968, Los Angeles Dodgers pitcher Don Drysdale set a major league record with his sixth consecutive shutout. Four days later, Drysdale finally allowed a run after more than a month of shutout pitching. Continue reading

Cards Bamboozle Cubs

 

This Week in 1960s Baseball

(June 15, 1964) The most famous – and most productive – trade in St. Louis Cardinals history was made today when the Cardinals sent a pair of former 20-game winners, Ernie Broglio and Bobby Shantz, along with outfielder Doug Clemens, to the Chicago Cubs for three players: pitchers Jack Spring and Paul Toth, and an outfielder named Lou Brock. Continue reading

Dodgers Wallop Cubs 10-2; Koufax Whiffs 18

 

This Week in 1960s Baseball

(April 24, 1962) Los Angeles Dodgers left-hander Sandy Koufax today tied a major league record by striking out 18 batters in a nine-inning game.

The Dodgers beat the Chicago Cubs 10-2 at Wrigley Field in Chicago. Continue reading

How Lou Flew to St. Loo

 

Swap Shop: Lou Brock for Ernie Broglio

It was probably the most lopsided trade of the 1960s. (After all, Milt Pappas was 30-29 in two-plus seasons for the Cincinnati Reds.)

At first, it looked like a “steal” for the Chicago Cubs. It turned out that the St. Louis Cardinals added a base thief who would be pivotal in helping them steal the 1964 National League pennant.

Ernie Broglio was the key player the Chicago Cubs coveted in the Lou Brock deal. Coming off an 18-8 season with the Cardinals in 1963, Broglio would win only seven games for the Cubs before retiring in 1966.

Ernie Broglio was the key player the Chicago Cubs coveted in the Lou Brock deal. Coming off an 18-8 season with the Cardinals in 1963, Broglio would win only seven games for the Cubs before retiring in 1966.

The Cardinals sent two former 20-game winners, Ernie Broglio and Bobby Shantz, along with outfielder Doug Clemens, to the Cubs for pitchers Jack Spring and Paul Toth, and an outfielder named Lou Brock.

From the Cubs’ perspective, Broglio was the key player in the deal. He was a proven winner, notching 21 victories in 1960 and leading the Cardinals in 1963 with an 18-8 record and a 2.99 ERA. From 1960-1963, Broglio averaged 15 wins and 218 innings per season, with a combined ERA of 3.15.

But that wasn’t the Ernie Broglio that the Cubs received in exchange for Brock.

In 11 starts for the Cardinals in 1964, Broglio was 3-5 with a 3.50 ERA. A change of scenery didn’t help. Over the rest of the 1964 campaign, Broglio was 4-7 with a 4.04 ERA for the Cubs.

And the other players acquired by the Cubs didn’t help to compensate for Broglio’s slide. In 20 relief appearances with the Cubs, Shantz was 0-1 with a 5.56 ERA and a single save. And Clemens batted .279 with two home runs and 12 RBIs in 54 games.

(In August, the Cubs sold Shantz to the Philadelphia Phillies. He retired at the end of the 1964 season.)

For Brock, the move to St. Louis launched him on his Hall of Fame career as he led the Cardinals to the World Series. In 103 games, he hit .348 and scored 84 runs, with nine triples, 12 home runs, 44 RBIs and 33 stolen bases.

Lou Brock was a speedy outfield prospect when he was acquired by the St. Louis Cardinals in 1964. Sixteen seasons later – all with the Cardinals – he would retire with seven stolen base titles, more than 3,000 hits, and a place reserved in Cooperstown.

Lou Brock was a speedy outfield prospect when he was acquired by the St. Louis Cardinals in 1964. Sixteen seasons later – all with the Cardinals – he would retire with seven stolen base titles, more than 3,000 hits, and a place reserved in Cooperstown.

In the World Series against the New York Yankees, Brock was instrumental in helping St. Louis take the championship, batting .300 with 5 RBIs and nine hits in seven games, including two doubles and a home run.

Brock would be a standout performer for the Cardinals for the next decade and a half, batting a combined .297 (while batting .300 or better seven times), leading the league in stolen bases seven times and collecting over 2,700 hits (on his way to 3,023 hits for his career).

It was a trade that neither team – or its fans – would ever forget. (Or, in the case of Cubs’ fans, forgive.)

 

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World’s Fastest Catcher?

 

This Week in 1960s Baseball

(September 1, 1966) St. Louis Cardinals catcher Tim McCarver hit his thirteenth triple of the season in helping the Redbirds beat the Atlanta Braves at Busch Stadium, 7-4.

Tim McCarver is still the only catcher to lead the National League in triples.

Tim McCarver is still the only catcher to lead the National League in triples.

It was the last triple McCarver would hit for the 1966 season, but it would be enough to lead the league, as McCarver edged out teammate Lou Brock, who finished the season with 12 triples.

The Memphis native became the first catcher to lead a league in three-baggers.

McCarver’s last triple came with two outs in the bottom of the third, scoring Orlando Cepeda. It was his second RBI of the game. McCarver had already driven in a run in the second inning with a single that scored Mike Shannon from second base.

Winning pitcher for the Cardinals was Steve Carlton (3-2). The losing pitcher was Dick Kelley (4-3).

McCarver, an All-Star in 1966, would finish the season batting .274 with 12 home runs and 68 RBIs. His triples crown that year would mark the only time he led the league in any hitting category.

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Eight for Eight … Just Great

 

This Week in 1960s Baseball

(May 20, 1962) Always known more for his prowess with his glove than his bat, Chicago Cubs rookie second baseman Ken Hubbs today was baseball’s single best hitter.

Ken Hubbs won both a Gold Glove and the National League Rookie of the Year award for 1962.

In a double header against the Philadelphia Phillies, Chicago Cubs second baseman Ken Hubbs stroked eight singles on the day, raising his season’s batting average to .307.

During the Cubs’ double header sweep of the Philadelphia Phillies, Hubbs stroked eight singles in 10 trips to the plate at Connie Mack Stadium. Hubbs scored twice and drove in two runs as the Cubs won both ends of the twin bill, 6-4 and 11-2.

In the first game, the Phillies lost despite getting home runs from the bats of Tony Taylor, Johnny Callison and Clay Dalrymple. Cubs left fielder Lou Brock drove in four runs for winning pitcher Cal Koonce (2-0).

In the nightcap, home runs by Billy Williams, Ernie Banks and George Altman – in addition to Hubbs’ five for five hitting performance – spurred the Cubs to an 11-2 victory. Bob Buhl (2-2) pitched a complete game for the win.

At the end of this doubleheader, Hubbs was batting .307. He would finish the season – his first full season in the big leagues – batting .260 and winning the Gold Glove for his play at second base.

Ken Hubbs won both a Gold Glove and the National League Rookie of the Year award for 1962.

Ken Hubbs won both a Gold Glove and the National League Rookie of the Year award for 1962.

He would also be named Rookie of the Year for 1962.

Speed Wins

 

Glancing Back, and Remembering Lou Brock

The most famous – and most productive – trade in St. Louis Cardinals history was made on June 15, 1964. The Cardinals sent a pair of former 20-game winners, Ernie Broglio and Bobby Shantz, along with outfielder Doug Clemens, to the Chicago Cubs for three players: Pitchers Jack Spring and Paul Toth, and an outfielder named Lou Brock.

Lou Brock twice led the National League in runs scored, with 113 in 1967 and 126 in 1971.

Lou Brock twice led the National League in runs scored, with 113 in 1967 and 126 in 1971.

Lou Brock had a fabulous second half for the Cardinals in 1964. In 103 games, he hit .348 and scored 84 runs, with nine triples, 12 home runs, 44 RBIs and 33 stolen bases. He was the offensive spark plug for a Cardinal team that won its first pennant since 1946. In the World Series against the New York Yankees, Brock was instrumental in helping St. Louis take the championship, batting .300 with five RBIs and nine hits in seven games, including two doubles and a home run.

Brock’s performance was no fluke. He led the league in stolen bases each year from 1966 to 1969. His best year offensively was during the Cardinals’ pennant-winning season of 1967. Brock had career highs in hits (206), triples (12), home runs (21), RBIs (76) and batted .299. He led the majors with 113 runs scored.

In the 1967 World Series against the Boston Red Sox, Brock hit .414 with 12 hits and three stolen bases as the Cardinals took the Series four games to three. In 1968, Brock capped another strong regular season – when he led the major leagues in doubles (46), triples (14), and stolen bases (62) – by elevating his performance again in the Fall Classic. Against the Detroit Tigers, Brock hit .464 with 13 hits in seven games. His hits included three doubles, a triple and two home runs. Brock also drove in five runs and stole seven bases. His performance probably would have made him a strong candidate for World Series Most Valuable Player had the Cardinals been able to hold on and win the Series’ seventh game.

Brock finished his career with the Cardinals, retiring in 1979 with 3,023 hits and, at the time, the career record for stolen bases with 938. He eventually broke Maury Wills’ single-season record for stolen bases with 118 in 1974.

Lou Brock was baseball’s most prolific base stealer during the 1960s. He led the National League in steals from 1966-1969.

Lou Brock was baseball’s most prolific base stealer during the 1960s. He led the National League in steals from 1966-1969.

He was the most prolific base stealer during the 1960s, with 430 (Luis Aparicio was tops in the American League with 342 stolen bases during the decade).  And though Brock recorded over 3,000 hits during his career, he never led the league in that category.

Brock was an All-Star six times. He was elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1985.

 

 

 

 

 

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Rock Around the Brock

 

Glancing Back, and Remembering Ernie Broglio

The short career of pitcher Ernie Broglio was really the sum of two careers. For five seasons, he was one of the best right-handers in the National League as a member of the St. Louis Cardinals’ starting rotation. Then in three seasons with the Chicago Cubs, he was a heartbreaking disaster, pitching against impossible expectations with an arm that was out of juice.

Ernie Broglio led the National League in wins in 1960 with a 21-9 record. He won 18 games for the Cardinals in 1963.

Ernie Broglio led the National League in wins in 1960 with a 21-9 record. He won 18 games for the Cardinals in 1963.

Broglio was signed by the independent Oakland Oaks of the Pacific Coast League in 1954 and was acquired by the New York Giants two years later. He won 16 minor league games in each of the next tw0 seasons, and was dealt to the Cardinals in October of 1958.

Broglio was 7-12 in his rookie season with the Cardinals, but led the National League in wins in 1960 with a 21-9 record, posting a 2.74 ERA (second in the league to Mike McCormick’s 2.70). He slipped to 9-12 in 1961 and flipped his record to 12-9 in 1962, finishing third on the team in wins and in innings pitched (222.1).

In 1963, Broglio’s 18-8 record tied him for the team lead in victories (with Bob Gibson). Working almost entirely as a starter, he was second on the team in earned run average (2.99), innings pitched (250), shutouts (5) and complete games (11).

In 1964, Broglio pitched effectively but had only a 3-5 record (with a 3.50 ERA) when the Cardnals traded him with Doug Clemens and Bobby Shantz to the Chicago Cubs for Lou Brock, Jack Spring and Paul Toth. It turned out to be one of the most-lopsided deals of the decade, as Broglio won only seven games for the Cubs over the next three seasons while Brock led the Cardinals to the 1964 National League pennant in 1964 en route to a Hall of Fame career.

Ernie Broglio was 3-5 for the Cardinals in 1964 when he was traded to the Chicago Cubs for <a rel=

Ernie Broglio was 3-5 for the Cardinals in 1964 when he was traded to the Chicago Cubs for Lou Brock. He would win only seven games for the Cubs over the next three seasons.

The fact was, Broglio’s had little left after pitching 218 innings per season during the previous four yearswith the Cardinals.  He was 4-7 for the Cubs over the remainder of the 1964 season. That was more games than he would win for Chicago over the next two years combined. He retired, at age 30, after going 2-6 in 1966.

Broglio posted a 77-74 career record with a 3.74 ERA.

 

 

 

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