Short Among the Braves

 

Glancing Back, and Remembering Johnny Logan

For a decade, Johnny Logan provided All-Star caliber shortstop play for the Milwaukee Braves. He teamed with another infield All-Star, second baseman Red Schoendienst, at the end of the 1950s, when the Braves took back-to-back National League pennants. Continue reading

Jack of All Bases

 

Glancing Back, and Remembering Jackie Brandt

Jackie Brandt was a multi-talented outfielder who played for five different teams during his 11-year major league career. His best seasons came with the Baltimore Orioles, where he was an All-Star in 1961. Continue reading

Leading with Hands and Heart

 

Glancing Back, and Remembering Red Schoendienst

In more than 60 years in a major league uniform (as a player, coach and manager), no individual was unanimously more respected for his talent and his heart than Red Schoendienst. He was a good hitter and a great fielder, a leader of winners whether on the field or from the dugout.

Red Schoendienst led the National League with 26 stolen bases as a rookie with the Cardinals in 1945. His .342 batting average in 1953 was second to Brooklyn’s Carl Furillo.

Red Schoendienst led the National League with 26 stolen bases as a rookie with the Cardinals in 1945. His .342 batting average in 1953 was second to Brooklyn’s Carl Furillo.

Schoendienst played 11 seasons with the St. Louis Cardinals, batting a combined .289 and was named to the National League All-Star team nine times. His best season offensively for the Cardinals came in 1953, when he batted .342 with 15 home runs and 79 RBIs.

In 1956 Schoendienst was traded by the Cardinals with Jackie Brandt, Dick Littlefield and Bill Sarni to the New York Giants for Al Dark, Ray Katt, Don Liddle and Whitey Lockman. He hit a combined .302 in 1956 and hit .309 in 1957, playing the last 93 games with the Braves after being traded to Milwaukee for Ray Crone, Danny O’Connell and Bobby Thomson. He finished the 1957 season with 200 hits, tops in the major leagues. He was a key ingredient in the Braves’ success, being named to the All-Star team for the tenth time and finishing fourth in the Most Valuable Player balloting.

Red Schoendienst led the National League with 26 stolen bases as a rookie with the Cardinals in 1945. His .342 batting average in 1953 was second to Brooklyn’s Carl Furillo.

Red Schoendienst led the National League with 26 stolen bases as a rookie with the Cardinals in 1945. His .342 batting average in 1953 was second to Brooklyn’s Carl Furillo.

Schoendienst played four seasons in Milwaukee, hitting a combined .278, and was released by the Braves following the 1960 season. He signed with St. Louis and finished his career where it started, hitting .300 in 1961 and .301 in 1962 as a part-time player. He retired six games into the 1963 season to become a Cardinal coach and, later, the team’s manager.

Schoendienst finished his 19-season career with 2,449 hits for a .289 batting average. He was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1989.

 

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Let the Trading Begin

 

This Week in 1960s Baseball

(January 3, 1961) The Kansas City Athletics today announced that Frank ‘Trader’ Lane had been named the team’s the general manager and executive vice president.

Frank Lane

Frank Lane

Lane had been the general manager for the Cleveland Indians since November of 1957. During his three seasons at the helm of the Cleveland franchise, he guided the Tribe to a pair of fourth-place finishes and a second-place finish in 1959. He also engineered one of the most infamous trades in Indians’ history, dealing American League home run champion and fan favorite Rocky Colavito to the Detroit Tigers for Harvey Kuenn after the 1959 season.

He was known as “Trader Lane” for his propensity to deal star players. During his career as a baseball executive (that included tours with the Chicago White Sox and St. Louis Cardinals before Cleveland), Lane made over 200 trades that included players such as Jim Busby, Norm Cash, Roger Maris, Enos Slaughter, Red Schoendienst, and Early Wynn. He reportedly tried to trade Stan Musial, but Cardinals’ owner August Busch nixed the deal.

While in Cleveland, Lane once even traded managers – Joe Gordon for Detroit Tigers skipper Jimmy Dykes.

Lane would not have much time to make trades for the A’s. Lane was ousted from his position in August 1961 as a result of a lingering feud with Kansas City owner Charles Finley. The dispute resulted in a lawsuit that would not be settled until 1965.

 

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