Babe Ruth Minus 100 Pounds?

 

This Week in 1960s Baseball

(May 25, 1965) The Cleveland Indians today defeated the New York Yankees 5-1 in front of 4,925 fans at Yankee Stadium.

The winning pitcher was Sonny Siebert (5-2), who allowed three hits and one run in five innings of work. Siebert struck out seven Yankee batters.

Sam McDowell picked up his first save of the season by allowing three hits and no runs over the final four innings. McDowell struck out five.

The losing pitcher was Jim Bouton (3-5). Bouton allowed five hits, including home runs from Vic Davalillo and Fred Whitfield.

Vic Davalillo’s three-hit performance (including a pair of home runs and five RBIs) raised his league-leading batting average to .376.

Vic Davalillo’s three-hit performance (including a pair of home runs and five RBIs) raised his league-leading batting average to .376.

Davalillo was the game’s hitting star. Cleveland’s center fielder had three hits in four at-bats with a pair of home runs and four RBIs. He hit a solo home run off Bouton with two outs in the second inning.

In the sixth inning, with the game tied 1-1, Whitfield led off the inning with his seventh home run of the season. Bouton gave up a single to Leon Wagner and walked Max Alvis before Davalillo hit his second home run of the game to put the Tribe ahead 5-1.

Davalillo’s three-hit performance raised his league-leading batting average to .376.

Davalillo would finish the season with a .301 batting average (third highest in the American League). He was fourth in the league with 26 stolen bases and third with 127 singles.

Davalillo also finished his third major league season with five home runs … three more than Babe Ruth hit in his third season.

 

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Scratching Out Wins

 

Glancing Back, and Remembering Jack Kralick

Jack Kralick was a slender, left-handed starting pitcher with first-division stuff … and second-division teams playing behind him. He could be dominating – even un-hittable – on occasion. He had an appetite for innings, and kept his team in the game.

As a member of the Cleveland Indians, Jack Kralick led the team in wins in both 1963 (13-9) and 1964 (12-7).

As a member of the Cleveland Indians, Jack Kralick led the team in wins in both 1963 (13-9) and 1964 (12-7).

Kralick was signed out of Michigan State University by the Chicago White Sox in 1955. He never pitched in Chicago. He was released by the White Sox in 1958 and signed immediately as a free agent by the Washington Senators, making his debut with the Senators at the end of the 1959 season. He was 8-6 as a rookie with the Senators in 1960, posting a 3.04 ERA as a starter-reliever, with seven complete games (and two shutouts) in 17 starts.

Kralick moved with the franchise to Minnesota in 1961 and went 13-11 as part of the Twins’ starting rotation. He pitched 242 innings for the Twins, posting a 3.61 earned run average with 11 complete games and two shutouts. He was 12-11 for the Twins in 1962.

In May of 1963, Kralick was traded to the Cleveland Indians for pitcher Jim Perry. At 13-9, Kralick led the Tribe staff in victories (tied with Mudcat Grant) and posted a 2.92 ERA, best among the Indians’ starters that season.

He started strong in 1964, going 8-4 with a 2.60 ERA in the first half of the season, and was named to the American League All-Star team. He finished the 1964 season at 12-7 with a 3.21 ERA, leading the team in victories for the second consecutive season.

Jack Kralick pitched a no-hitter against the Kansas City Athletics in 1962. He retired the first 25 batters he faced until a ninth-inning walk spoiled his bid for a perfect game.

Jack Kralick pitched a no-hitter against the Kansas City Athletics in 1962. He retired the first 25 batters he faced until a ninth-inning walk spoiled his bid for a perfect game.

The 1964 season was one of transition for the Cleveland pitching staff, with the influx of young arms like those of Sam McDowell, Luis Tiant, Sonny Siebert and Tommy John. Kralick, now 30, was a senior member of the staff, and faded to 5-11 in 1965, spending more time coming out of the bullpen than working in the starting rotation. He was 3-4 mopping up in relief in 1966, and appeared in only two games in 1967 before being purchased by the New York Mets. He retired rather than report to the Mets.

In his nine-season career, Kralick posted a 67-65 record with a 3.56 ERA. He pitched a 1-0 no-hitter against the Kansas City Athletics on August 26, 1962. He retired the first 25 batters he faced before walking George Alusik in the ninth inning.

 

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Wet Wins

 

Glancing Back, and Remembering Gaylord Perry

Gaylord Perry was a great pitcher partly because he was also a great mound psychologist.

Gaylord Perry won 314 games over a 22-year major league career. He was the first pitcher to win the <a rel=

Notorious for being the last great spitball pitcher (a pitch outlawed four decades before Perry’s career began), he deftly used the uncertainty of that pitch to keep batters thinking about it rather than concentrating on his “stuff,” which was considerable … wet or dry.

Perry was signed by the San Francisco Giants in 1958 and made his debut with the team at the end of the 1962 season. He was used primarily as a long reliever and spot starter during his first three seasons with the Giants, but gradually moved into the Giants’ starting rotation and posted a 21-8 record with a 2.99 ERA in 1966.

Perry was always an “innings eater” and, from 1967 through 1975, never pitched less than 280 innings in a season. He pitched more than 300 innings six times in his career. He won 50 games for the Giants from 1967 through 1969, and led the National League in victories with a 23-13 record in 1970 (the same year that brother Jim Perry led the American League with 24 wins and won the American League Cy Young award).

Perry went 16-12 in 1971 with a 2.76 ERA, and over the winter the Giants dealt Perry and shortstop Frank Duffy to the Cleveland Indians for Sam McDowell. Perry responded with the best season of his career: a 24-16 record (one-third of the Indians’ 72 victories), a 1.92 ERA over 342.2 innings pitched, and 29 complete games, including five shutouts. He was named American League Cy Young award winner for the 1972 season.

Gaylord Perry’s breakout season came in 1966, when he went 21-8 with a 2.99 ERA for the San Francisco Giants. That season he was also named to the All-Star team for the first time.

Gaylord Perry’s breakout season came in 1966, when he went 21-8 with a 2.99 ERA for the San Francisco Giants. That season he was also named to the All-Star team for the first time.

Perry won 19 games for the Tribe in 1973 and 21 games in 1974. He pitched 57 complete games over those two seasons. During the 1975 season, he was traded to the Texas Rangers for Jim Bibby, Jackie Brown, Rick Waits and $100,000. He won a combined 18 games that season, and followed up with a pair of 15-win campaigns over the next two seasons. Then Perry was traded to the San Diego Padres, and posted a 21-6 record with a 2.73 ERA in 1978 – good enough to claim his second Cy Young award. Perry was the first pitcher to win that award in each league.

He hung on for five more years, pitching for Texas, the New York Yankees, Atlanta Braves, Seattle Mariners and Kansas City Royals. He closed out his 22-year career with a 314-265 record and a 3.11 ERA. He pitched 5,350 innings over his career, the sixth highest total in major league history.

A five-time All-Star, Perry was elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1991.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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The Hit Miser Strikes Again

 

Lights Out: Sam McDowell Pitches Back-to-Back One-Hitters

 

When: May 1, 1966

Where: Municipal Stadium, Cleveland, Ohio

Game Time: 2.51

Attendance: 9,655

He came into the 1966 season as the reigning American League champion in strikeouts (325 in 1965) and ERA (2.18). And Sam McDowell started out the 1966 season proving he was not only the league’s most overpowering pitcher, but also, at his best, almost unhittable.

Sam McDowell pitched back-to-back one-hit shutouts in 1966.

Sam McDowell pitched back-to-back one-hit shutouts in 1966.

McDowell opened the season with 3 victories in his 4 April starts, including a complete game victory over the New York Yankees and a one-hit shutout against the Kansas City Athletics. Six days following his one-hitter, he faced the Chicago White Sox and did what only three major league pitchers had done before.

McDowell squared off against White Sox left-hander Tommy John, who had won 14 games for Chicago in 1965 after being acquired from the Indians the previous winter. After pitching a scoreless first inning, John gave up a two-out double to Pedro Gonzalez. The next Tribe batter, shortstop Larry Brown, singled to drive in Gonzalez.

It would be the only run of the game.

John would allow only four more hits in pitching through the seventh inning. Reliever Bob Locker pitched a scoreless eighth inning for the White Sox. But allowing even one run wouldn’t be good enough against McDowell that day.

McDowell not only pitched his second consecutive shutout that day (and third consecutive complete game), but also tossed his second consecutive one-hitter, a feat that hadn’t been done since Lon Warneke pitched back-to-back one-hitters in 1934. (Of course, Johnny Vander Meer pitched back-to-back no-hitters in 1938.) McDowell faced 34 White Sox batters, striking out 10 (for the second consecutive game) and walking five. The only White Sox hit came in the third inning when Don Buford doubled.

Prior to McDowell, the last pitcher to throw consecutive one-hitters was Lon Warneke in 1934.

Prior to McDowell, the last pitcher to throw consecutive one-hitters was Lon Warneke in 1934.

McDowell would win only five more games the rest of the season. Ongoing shoulder problems reduced his number of starts, and generally feeble support from Cleveland bats limited McDowell to only a 9-8 season, even with five shutouts, a league-leading 225 strikeouts and a 2.87 ERA.

 

 

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Ringin’ Out the Wins

 

Glancing Back, and Remembering Gary Bell

Gary Bell started out his career as a hard-throwing starter, relying on heat and guts while pitching for struggling Cleveland Indians teams. He gradually evolved into one of the American League’s most effective middle relievers with off-speed pitches that helped him get more out of less fastball.

Gary Bell was a versatile pitcher for the Cleveland Indians, effective as both a starter and a reliever. He led the team with 16 saves in 1965, then was oved into the starting rotation in 1966, winning 14 games with a 3.22 ERA.

Gary Bell was a versatile pitcher for the Cleveland Indians, effective as both a starter and a reliever. He led the team with 16 saves in 1965, then was moved into the starting rotation in 1966, winning 14 games with a 3.22 ERA.

Bell was signed by the Indians and was pitching in the majors three years later, going 12-10 with a 3.31 ERA as an Indians starter. In 1959, again as mostly a starter for the Tribe, Bell went 16-11 with a 4.04 ERA

His record slipped to 9-10 in 1960 and 12-16 in 1961. In 1962, he was moved back to the Indians bullpen, going 10-9 with 12 saves. During the next three seasons, working almost exclusively in relief, Bell went 22-16 with a combined 3.42 ERA. The 1965 campaign produced career highs in both appearances (60) and saves (17).

In 1966, Bell returned to the Indians’ starting rotation, posting a 14-15 record with a 3.22 ERA. He led the Indians pitching staff in games started (37), complete games (12), and finished fifth in the American League (and second on the team to league-leader Sam McDowell) with a career-best 194 strikeouts.

Bell opened the 1967 season as a starter and lost five of his first six decisions for Cleveland before being traded to the Boston Red Sox for Tony Horton and Don Demeter. He went 12-8 the rest of the way for the pennant-winning Bosox, and followed up with an 11-11 season for Boston in 1968.

Acquired by the Boston Red Sox early in the 1967 season, Gary Bell played a prominent role in the team’s successful pennant push. Bell was 12-8 for the Red Sox, and saved two critical games in September.

Acquired by the Boston Red Sox early in the 1967 season, Gary Bell played a prominent role in the team’s successful pennant push. Bell was 12-8 for the Red Sox, and saved two critical games in September.

The Seattle Pilots selected Bell in the expansion draft prior to the 1969 season, and he went 2-6 for Seattle before being traded to the Chicago White Sox for pitcher Bob Locker. He appeared in 23 games for the White Sox with no decisions before being released and retiring.

Bell ended his career with a 121-117 record with a 3.68 ERA over 12 seasons. He was a three-time All-Star: in 1960, 1966 and 1968.

 

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O, What a Pitcher

 

Glancing Back, and Remembering Dave McNally

For all but one of his 13 full seasons in the major leagues, Dave McNally pitched for one team: the Baltimore Orioles. He was on the mound when Baltimore won its first World Series, and when Al Kaline registered his 3,000th career hit.

Dave McNally won 181 games for the Baltimore Orioles, the most by a left-hander in franchise history.

Dave McNally won 181 games for the Baltimore Orioles, the most by a left-hander in franchise history.

For nearly a decade, McNally was a major force among American league pitchers. From 1968 through 1974, he won 133 games for the Orioles, and won 20 or more games four consecutive seasons.

He was also the only pitcher in World Series history to come to bat with the bases loaded – and hit a home run.

McNally was signed by the Orioles in 1960 and made his first appearance in an Orioles uniform at the end of the 1962 season, shutting out the Kansas City Athletics 3-0 on a two-hitter. Over the next three seasons, appearing mostly as a spot starter, McNally won 27 games. In 1966, as a member of the Orioles starting rotation for the full season, he went 13-6 with a 3.17 ERA. He pitched and won the fourth game of the 1966 World Series, beating Don Drysdale and the Los Angeles Dodgers 1-0 on a two-hit shutout.

McNally broke into the 20-victory circle for the first time in 1968 when he went 22-10 with a 1.95 ERA, third best in the American League behind Luis Tiant (1.60) and Sam McDowell (1.81). He would win 20 or more games for the Orioles in each of the next three seasons, leading the league with 24 victories in 1970 and leading the league with an .808 winning percentage on a 21-5 record for 1971.

Dave McNally was a 20-game winner four times for the Baltimore Orioles. He led the American League with 24 victories in 1970.

Dave McNally was a 20-game winner four times for the Baltimore Orioles. He led the American League with 24 victories in 1970.

McNally won his last two decisions at the end of the 1968 season, and then went 15-0 to start the 1968 season, not losing until August. Three times in his career, he won 12 or more games in a row.

Despite posting a 2.95 ERA, McNally’s won-lost record in 1972 slipped to 13-17, his first losing record since 1964. He bounced back to win 17 games in 1973 and 16 games in 1974. It would be his last season in Baltimore. In December of 1974, the Orioles traded McNally with Bill Kirkpatrick and Rich Coggins to the Montreal Expos for Ken Singleton and Mike Torrez. He went 3-6 with the fledgling Expos and then retired in June of 1975.

McNally finished his career at 184-119 with a 3.24 ERA. He won 181 games for Baltimore, still the most by any Orioles left-hander.

He was named to the American League All-Star team three times: in 1969, 1970 and 1972.

 

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Cleveland’s Mc-Complement

 

Glancing Back, and Remembering Sonny Siebert

During the mid-1960s, the Cleveland Indians had not only the most prolific strikeout pitcher in Sam McDowell, but also the league’s most lethal strikeout tandem. Sonny Siebert was the other half of that duo, and the right-handed complement to Sudden Sam.

Sonny Siebert averaged 9.1 strikeouts per nine innings pitched in 1965, when he went 16-8 with a 2.43 ERA.

Sonny Siebert averaged 9.1 strikeouts per nine innings pitched in 1965, when he went 16-8 with a 2.43 ERA.

Siebert was signed by the Indians out of the University of Missouri and pitched in Cleveland’s farm system for five seasons. He was a .500 pitcher until 1962, when he won 15 games for Charleston in the Eastern League. After a 7-9 rookie season in 1964, Siebert moved into the Indians’ starting rotation and stayed there for four seasons.

Clevelands’s young starting rotation of McDowell, Siebert and Luis Tiant was one of the best in the American League in terms of “stuff.” Unfortunately, that trio didn’t have the supporting talent to turn them into consistent winners. Of the three, Siebert seems to have fared the best at first. In his first season as a full-time starter, Siebert went 16-8 with a 2.43 ERA and 191 strikeouts in 188.2 innings pitched. He finished the season fourth in the American League in strikeouts, second in strikeouts per nine innings (9.1) and third in ERA. (Teammate McDowell led the league in all three categories.)

Siebert repeated his 16-8 campaign for 1966, increasing his innings pitched to 241 while keeping his ERA at a low 2.80. His 161 strikeouts were tenth best in the league (led again by McDowell). No other team in the American League had as potent a 1-2 strikeout punch.

On June 10, 1966, Sonny Siebert pitched a 2-0 no-hitter against the Washington Senators. He struck out seven and walked only one batter.

On June 10, 1966, Sonny Siebert pitched a 2-0 no-hitter against the Washington Senators. He struck out seven and walked only one batter.

Over the next two seasons, Siebert was a combined 22-22 for Cleveland despite a combined ERA of only 2.69. At the beginning of the 1969 season, Siebert was traded with Joe Azcue and Vicente Romo to the Boston Red Sox for Dick Ellsworth, Ken Harrelson and Juan Pizarro. He won 14 games for the Red Sox in 1969, 15 games in 1970, and 16 games in 1971. After a 12-12 season in 1972, Siebert was traded to the Texas Rangers. He played for four different teams over the next three seasons, posting a combined 22-26 record. He retired after the 1975 season.

During his 12-year career, Siebert won 140 games with a career ERA of 3.21.

 

 

 

 

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A Winner for Teams that Couldn’t

 

Glancing Back, and Remembering Dick Donovan

Dick Donovan was a pitcher’s pitcher. He was a four-way threat on the mound – fastball, curveball, slider, control – who pitched with his head as much as with his right arm. According to Mickey Vernon, his manager with the Washington Senators, Donovan “has every pitch planned.”

Pitching for the lowly Washington Senators in their inaugural 1961 season, Dick Donovan went 10-10 and led the major leagues with a 2.40 ERA.

Pitching for the lowly Washington Senators in their inaugural 1961 season, Dick Donovan went 10-10 and led the major leagues with a 2.40 ERA.

Donovan was signed by the Boston Braves in 1947 and spent the next six seasons (minus two years in military service), trying to find himself as a professional pitcher. His break came when he was acquired by the Chicago White Sox prior to the 1955 season. Inserted into the White Sox starting rotation, Donovan responded with a 15-9 record and a 3.32 ERA, tying for the team lead in victories with Billy Pierce. He pitched 11 complete games with five shutouts in 1955.

Donovan was 12-10 in 1956, and then went 16-6 in 1957. His victory total in 1957 was third best in the American League (behind 20-game winners Pierce and Jim Bunning), and his .727 winning percentage led the league. He tied Pierce for the league lead in complete games with 16, and he averaged only 1.84 walks per 9 innings, posting the second lowest average in the league (for the third year in a row). He finished second in the Cy Young voting to Warren Spahn.

Donovan went 15-14 with a 3.01 ERA in 1958, this time leading the league with 1.9 walks per 9 innings. (He would lead the American League in that category two more times in his career.) In 1959, the year the White Sox broke the New York Yankees’ lock on the American League pennant, Donovan suffered from shoulder problems that limited his effectiveness and produced a 9-10 record with a 3.66 ERA. In the 1959 World Series, Donovan made three appearances, losing Game Three but picking up the save in Game Five. The 1959 World Series would be his only post-season appearance.

Lingering concerns about his arm limited Donovan’s workload in 1960, as he made only eight starts in 33 appearances. Donovan finished the season at 6-1 with a 5.38 ERA. The White Sox left him unprotected for the expansion draft, and the fledgling Washington Senators plucked Donovan for their own starting rotation. He responded with a 10-10 record in 1961, leading the majors with a 2.40 ERA.

Donovan was 20-10 for the Cleveland Indians in 1962.

Donovan was 20-10 for the Cleveland Indians in 1962.

Donovan spent only one season in Washington. Immediately after the 1961 season, he was traded with Gene Green and Jim Mahoney to the Cleveland Indians for Jim Piersall. In his first season with the Tribe, Donovan had the best record of his career: 20-10 with a 3.59 ERA. He pitched a career-high 250.2 innings with 16 complete games and a league-leading five shutouts.

Now 35, Donovan struggled through the 1963 season, going 11-13 with a 4.24 ERA. In 1964, the Indians’ staff was transitioning to younger pitchers like Sam McDowell, Luis Tiant and Sonny Siebert. Donovan’s record slipped to 7-9 in 1964, and he was released by Cleveland after going 1-3 in 1965.

A good hitter, Donovan batted .163 during his career with 15 home runs and 64 RBIs. As a pitcher, Donovan compiled a 122-99 record with a 3.67 ERA. He was a three-time All-Star.

 

 

 

 

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Suddenly, You’re Out!

 

Glancing Back, and Remembering Sam McDowell

His fastball was on top of the plate before you could barely get the bat off your shoulder. The break in his curve was nothing less than wicked. And his imposing stature on the mound made his heat, and occasional wildness, all the more intimidating.

"Sudden" Sam McDowell struck out more American League batters in the 1960s than any other pitcher.

“Sudden” Sam McDowell struck out more American League batters in the 1960s than any other pitcher.

“Sudden” Sam McDowell threw as hard as any pitcher of his time. And he struck out more American League batters (1,663) than anyone else in the 1960s.

McDowell was signed by the Cleveland Indians in 1959. He saw limited service with the Indians from 1961 to 1963, winning a total of six games in the majors in those three years. His breakout year was 1964. After an 8-0 start at Portland, the Tribe’s AAA affiliate, McDowell was brought up to the major league club , where he went 11-6 with 177 strikeouts in 173 innings and registered a 2.70 ERA.

McDowell was dominating in his first full season with the Indians. He went 17-11 with a fifth-place Cleveland team. McDowell led the league in strikeouts with 325, still the American League record for a left-hander. Always better known for his “stuff” than his control, McDowell led the league in wild pitches (17) and walks (132) as well. He also posted the league’s best ERA at 2.18.

Throughout the rest of the 1960s, despite consistently high strikeout totals and very respectable ERAs, McDowell was basically a .500 pitcher for the Indians. He led the league in strikeouts in 1966 (225), 1968 (283), and 1969 (279), finishing second with 236 to Jim Lonborg in 1967. In 1968 he posted a career-low ERA of 1.81 that was second best in the American League – to the 1.60 posted by teammate Luis Tiant. Despite these numbers, McDowell was only 55-51 for the years 1966 to 1969.

In 1965, his first full season with the Indians, McDowell set the American league record for strikeouts by a left-hander with 325.

In 1965, his first full season with the Indians, McDowell set the American league record for strikeouts by a left-hander with 325.

Although Mc Dowell’s only 20-victory season came in 1970, his best performance may have come a year earlier. Pitching for a woeful Cleveland club that lost 99 games during the 1969 season (one more than the expansion Seattle Pilots), McDowell was Cleveland’s one bright spot that season. He went 18-14 with a 2.94 ERA and pitched 18 complete games.

A six-time All-Star, McDowell finished his 15-year career with 141 victories and 2,453 strikeouts.

 

 

 

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Thinking Man’s Pitcher

 

Glancing Back, and Remembering Steve Hargan

There is one aspect of major league pitching that is better today than it was in the 1960s: the medicine behind it. In the days before Tommy John surgery and rotator cuff repair, arm injuries were, more often than not, fatal to a promising pitcher’s career. Misdiagnosed injuries too often led to conditions that could be avoided – or rehabilitated – today.

Steve Hargan was 14-13 with a 2.62 ERA in 1967, leading the American League with 6 shutouts and finishing second in complete games.

Steve Hargan was 14-13 with a 2.62 ERA in 1967, leading the American League with 6 shutouts and finishing second in complete games.

Today’s sports medicine might well have extended the career of a Hall of Famer such as Don Drysdale, or an outstanding hurler who might have been a HOFer such as Mel Stottlemyre, or a pitcher who showed great promise and occasional flashes or brilliance such as Steve Hargan.

Hargan was an outstanding all-around athlete who attracted the attention of major league scouts with his fastball. He was signed by the Cleveland Indians in 1961 and spent the next four seasons moving methodically through the Indians’ farm system. In Class D ball he learned the art of throwing the slider from Hall of Famer Hal Newhouser, and the addition of that pitch began his transformation from thrower to pitcher.

In 1965 Hargan was invited to the Indians’ spring training camp, but found the Tribe’s starting rotation already well-stocked with the likes of Sam McDowell, Sonny Siebert, Luis Tiant, Ralph Terry and Jack Kralick. Hargan opened the 1965 season at the Indians’ AAA club in Portland, going 13-5 with a 2.91 ERA in 24 starts. He was called up to Cleveland in August and went 4-3 with a 3.43 ERA as a starter and reliever.

He started the 1966 season in the Cleveland bullpen, but worked his way into the starting rotation and finished that season at 13-10 with a 2.48 ERA. He went 14-13 with a 2.62 ERA in 1967, leading the American League with six shutouts and finishing second in complete games (to Dean Chance) with 15.

That was when the arm problems began. He started experiencing tendonitis and bone spurs in his pitching elbow and went 8-15 in 1968 and 5-14 in 1969. Now primarily a sinkerball pitcher, Hargan had a strong comeback season in 1970, going 11-3 with a 2.90 ERA. But his arm problems returned in 1971 when his record slipped to 1-13, and he was returned to the minors in 1972 after an 0-3 start. It looked like his career was over at age 29.

Hargan made an impressive comeback to the big leagues, going 12-9 for the Texas Rangers in 1974 and 9-10 with a 3.80 ERA in 1975. He worked primarily as a reliever for the Rangers in 1976, going 8-8. He was drafted by the expansion Toronto Blue Jays prior to the 1977 season, was traded back to the Rangers and then was traded to the Atlanta Braves. His combined record for 1977 was 2-6 with a 6.55 ERA. He retired after the 1977 season.

Hargan put in 12 major league seasons – eight with Cleveland – for a combined record of 87-107 with a 3.92 ERA. He was a member of the American League All-Star team in 1967.

 

 

 

 

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